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Review

Blood Plasma Self-Separation Technologies during the Self-Driven Flow in Microfluidic Platforms

1
Advanced Energy Systems and Microdevices Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
2
Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Rossana Madrid
Bioengineering 2021, 8(7), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070094
Received: 29 May 2021 / Revised: 19 June 2021 / Accepted: 30 June 2021 / Published: 3 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Nano Biomedical Devices in Advanced Healthcare)
Blood plasma is the most commonly used biofluid in disease diagnostic and biomedical analysis due to it contains various biomarkers. The majority of the blood plasma separation is still handled with centrifugation, which is off-chip and time-consuming. Therefore, in the Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) field, an effective microfluidic blood plasma separation platform attracts researchers’ attention globally. Blood plasma self-separation technologies are usually divided into two categories: active self-separation and passive self-separation. Passive self-separation technologies, in contrast with active self-separation, only rely on microchannel geometry, microfluidic phenomena and hydrodynamic forces. Passive self-separation devices are driven by the capillary flow, which is generated due to the characteristics of the surface of the channel and its interaction with the fluid. Comparing to the active plasma separation techniques, passive plasma separation methods are more considered in the microfluidic platform, owing to their ease of fabrication, portable, user-friendly features. We propose an extensive review of mechanisms of passive self-separation technologies and enumerate some experimental details and devices to exploit these effects. The performances, limitations and challenges of these technologies and devices are also compared and discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: passive self-separation; microfluidics; microfiltration; sedimentation; Dean vortex; hydrophilicity passive self-separation; microfluidics; microfiltration; sedimentation; Dean vortex; hydrophilicity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, Y.; Nunna, B.B.; Talukder, N.; Etienne, E.E.; Lee, E.S. Blood Plasma Self-Separation Technologies during the Self-Driven Flow in Microfluidic Platforms. Bioengineering 2021, 8, 94. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070094

AMA Style

Wang Y, Nunna BB, Talukder N, Etienne EE, Lee ES. Blood Plasma Self-Separation Technologies during the Self-Driven Flow in Microfluidic Platforms. Bioengineering. 2021; 8(7):94. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070094

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Yudong, Bharath Babu Nunna, Niladri Talukder, Ernst Emmanuel Etienne, and Eon Soo Lee. 2021. "Blood Plasma Self-Separation Technologies during the Self-Driven Flow in Microfluidic Platforms" Bioengineering 8, no. 7: 94. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070094

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