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The Effect of Real-Time Video-Based Engagement and Feedback during Pedaling on Cadence Control and Exercise Motivation: A Proof-of-Concept Study

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
2
Department of Medicine and Neurology, AIMSS, Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne and Western Health, Sunshine Hospital, St Albans, Melbourne, VIC 3021, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Simon W Rabkin
Bioengineering 2021, 8(7), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070095
Received: 20 May 2021 / Revised: 24 June 2021 / Accepted: 26 June 2021 / Published: 5 July 2021
The use of video and music as an intrinsic, dissociative attentional stimulus during exercise is thought to distract from the physical discomfort of exercise, and contribute to improved exercise adherence; however, the effects of video-based feedback and engagement during pedaling on exercise performance and motivation are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were twofold. Firstly, to develop a novel video-based engagement regime for pedaling that links pedaling cadence with the play rate of a video, and secondly, to employ an instrumented pedaling device to assess the influence of the video engagement paradigm on cadence performance and exercise motivation. Eighteen healthy subjects participated in 15-min-duration pedaling sessions while targeting a specific low cadence (60 rotations per minute) and high cadence (100 rotations per minute), including pedaling with the provision of (i) target pedaling cadence information only, (ii) visual feedback on cadence control, including pedaling duration, pedaling cadence, and cadence deviation from target, and (iii) real-time engagement, which involved pedaling at the target speed to maintain the playback rate of a pre-recorded video. Cadence deviation from the target was evaluated, and self-reported exercise motivation examined with a post-exercise survey. Pedaling-cadence deviations significantly reduced with cadence feedback at both low and high cadence (p < 0.05). Participants reported enjoying feedback and video-based engagement during pedaling, with 83% of participants feeling that engagement motivated them to perform pedaling-based exercise. In conclusion, real-time cadence control feedback and video-based engagement during pedaling for healthy individuals may improve performance in targeted pedaling tasks. Through dissociation from the physical cues associated with exercise and fatigue, feedback and engagement may ultimately increase enjoyment and exercise compliance and adherence of pedaling-based exercise. The findings may be useful in prescription and maintenance of targeted pedaling exercises for stroke rehabilitation and exercise therapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: video feedback; exercise physiology; cycling; exercise performance; rehabilitation video feedback; exercise physiology; cycling; exercise performance; rehabilitation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Soni, M.; Wijeratne, T.; Ackland, D.C. The Effect of Real-Time Video-Based Engagement and Feedback during Pedaling on Cadence Control and Exercise Motivation: A Proof-of-Concept Study. Bioengineering 2021, 8, 95. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070095

AMA Style

Soni M, Wijeratne T, Ackland DC. The Effect of Real-Time Video-Based Engagement and Feedback during Pedaling on Cadence Control and Exercise Motivation: A Proof-of-Concept Study. Bioengineering. 2021; 8(7):95. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070095

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soni, Mukesh, Tissa Wijeratne, and David C. Ackland. 2021. "The Effect of Real-Time Video-Based Engagement and Feedback during Pedaling on Cadence Control and Exercise Motivation: A Proof-of-Concept Study" Bioengineering 8, no. 7: 95. https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering8070095

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