Next Article in Journal
A Revisit to the Formation and Mitigation of 3-Chloropropane-1,2-Diol in Palm Oil Production
Next Article in Special Issue
Pomological, Sensorial, Nutritional and Nutraceutical Profile of Seven Cultivars of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill)
Previous Article in Journal
A Cross-Cultural Evaluation of Liking and Perception of Salted Butter Produced from Different Feed Systems
Previous Article in Special Issue
Oregano Phytocomplex Induces Programmed Cell Death in Melanoma Lines via Mitochondria and DNA Damage
Open AccessArticle

Antibiofilm and Enzyme Inhibitory Potentials of Two Annonaceous Food Spices, African Pepper (Xylopia aethiopica) and African Nutmeg (Monodora myristica)

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Mineral Industries, University of Ngaoundere, Ngaoundere 454, Cameroon
2
Food Quality Control and Analysis Program, Ula Ali Kocman Vocational School, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, 48147 Ula Mugla, Turkey
3
Department of Chemistry Physical and Environment, Faculty of Sciences and Environment, “Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati, 111 Domneasca Street, 800201 Galati, Romania
4
Department of Medical Services and Techniques, Koycegiz Vocational School of Health Services, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, 48800 Mugla, Turkey
5
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mugla Sitki Kocman University, 48000 Mugla, Turkey
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1768; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121768
Received: 29 October 2020 / Revised: 26 November 2020 / Accepted: 27 November 2020 / Published: 29 November 2020
Food pathogens represent an important health threat, and it is relevant to study the effect of foodstuffs such as spices which can inhibit bacterial growth. This study reports the antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and enzyme (Acetylcholinesterase, Butyrylcholinesterase, urease, tyrosinase) inhibitory activities of two medicinal food spices belonging to the Annonaceae family, Monodora myristica and Xylopia aethiopica. GC-MS (gas chromatography mass spectrometry) analysis of silylated samples of Methanol-Dicloromethane (50:50) extracts of both plants led to the identification of nine compounds in M. myristica and seven compounds in X. aethiopica. M. myristica and X. aethiopica had the same minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 0.625 mg/mL and 2.5 mg/mL on C. albicans and E. coli, respectively. However, M. myristica had better activity than X. aethiopica on Staphylococcus aureus, while Pseudomonas aeruginosa was more susceptible to X. aethiopica than M. myristica. The lowest MIC value was 0.1325 mg/mL, exhibited by M. myristica on S. aureus. Both extracts showed good antibiofilm activity. On S. aureus, at the same concentration, M. myristica had better antibiofilm activity than X. aethiopica. On E. coli and Candida albicans, X. aethiopica had better antibiofilm activity than M. myristica at the same concentration. X. aethiopica showed better violacein inhibition in Chromobacterium violaceum CV12472, as its percentage inhibition of violacein varied from 80.5% ± 3.0% at MIC to 5.6 ± 0.2 at MIC/8, as compared to M. myristica with 75.1% ± 2.5% at MIC and 15.5% ± 1.1% at MIC/8. The anti-motility activity by swimming and swarming inhibition on P. aeruginosa PA01 was low at test concentrations and in both models, M. myristica showed higher motility inhibition than X. aethiopica. Although in enzyme inhibitory assays all extracts had low inhibitions compared to standards tested at the same concentrations, the results show that these plants can be used to manage food-borne infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: African food spices; GC-MS (gas chromatography mass spectrometry); antimicrobial; antibiofilm; violacein inhibition; swarming inhibition; swimming inhibition; anticholinesterase; antiurease; antityrosinase African food spices; GC-MS (gas chromatography mass spectrometry); antimicrobial; antibiofilm; violacein inhibition; swarming inhibition; swimming inhibition; anticholinesterase; antiurease; antityrosinase
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tamfu, A.N.; Ceylan, O.; Kucukaydin, S.; Ozturk, M.; Duru, M.E.; Dinica, R.M. Antibiofilm and Enzyme Inhibitory Potentials of Two Annonaceous Food Spices, African Pepper (Xylopia aethiopica) and African Nutmeg (Monodora myristica). Foods 2020, 9, 1768. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121768

AMA Style

Tamfu AN, Ceylan O, Kucukaydin S, Ozturk M, Duru ME, Dinica RM. Antibiofilm and Enzyme Inhibitory Potentials of Two Annonaceous Food Spices, African Pepper (Xylopia aethiopica) and African Nutmeg (Monodora myristica). Foods. 2020; 9(12):1768. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121768

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tamfu, Alfred N.; Ceylan, Ozgur; Kucukaydin, Selcuk; Ozturk, Mehmet; Duru, Mehmet E.; Dinica, Rodica M. 2020. "Antibiofilm and Enzyme Inhibitory Potentials of Two Annonaceous Food Spices, African Pepper (Xylopia aethiopica) and African Nutmeg (Monodora myristica)" Foods 9, no. 12: 1768. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121768

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop