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Open AccessArticle

Oregano Phytocomplex Induces Programmed Cell Death in Melanoma Lines via Mitochondria and DNA Damage

1
Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
2
Terra&Acqua Tech-Research Unit 7, Pharmaceutical Biology Lab, Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Piazzale Luciano Chiappini 3, 44123 Ferrara, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161 Rome, Italy.
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1486; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101486
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 12 October 2020 / Accepted: 15 October 2020 / Published: 17 October 2020
Plant secondary metabolites possess chemopreventive and antineoplastic properties, but the lack of information about their exact mechanism of action in mammalian cells hinders the translation of these compounds in suitable therapies. In light of this, firstly, Origanum vulgare L. hydroalcoholic extract was chemically characterized by spectrophotometric and chromatographic analyses; then, the molecular bases underlying its antitumor activity on B16-F10 and A375 melanoma cells were investigated. Oregano extract induced oxidative stress and inhibited melanogenesis and tumor cell proliferation, triggering programmed cell death pathways (both apoptosis and necroptosis) through mitochondria and DNA damage. By contrast, oregano extract was safe on healthy tissues, revealing no cytotoxicity and mutagenicity on C2C12 myoblasts, considered as non-tumor proliferating cell model system, and on Salmonella strains, by the Ames test. All these data provide scientific evidence about the potential application of this food plant as an anticancer agent in in vivo studies and clinical trials. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative stress; necroptosis; plant extract; secondary metabolite; γH2AX; copper oxidative stress; necroptosis; plant extract; secondary metabolite; γH2AX; copper
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nanni, V.; Di Marco, G.; Sacchetti, G.; Canini, A.; Gismondi, A. Oregano Phytocomplex Induces Programmed Cell Death in Melanoma Lines via Mitochondria and DNA Damage. Foods 2020, 9, 1486.

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