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Sensory, Microbiological and Physicochemical Characterisation of Functional Manuka Honey Yogurts Containing Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DPC16

1
School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2
School of Applied Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3
Bioactives Research New Zealand Limited, 465-467 Khyber Pass Road, Newmarket, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(1), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010106
Received: 8 November 2019 / Revised: 7 January 2020 / Accepted: 8 January 2020 / Published: 19 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Food Microbiology)
Consumer acceptance of synbiotics, which are synergistic combinations of probiotics and their prebiotic substrates, continues to expand in the functional food category. This research aimed at evaluating the effect of antibacterial manuka honey on the probiotic growth and sensory characteristics of potentially synbiotic yogurts manufactured with Lactobacillus reuteri DPC16. Probiotic viable count in yogurts with 5% w/v Manuka honey (Blend, UMFTM 18+, AMFTM 15+ and AMFTM 20+) was evaluated by the spread plate method over the refrigerated storage period of three weeks. A panel of 102 consumers preferred the yogurt made with invert syrup over the manuka honey variants, and the unsweetened control was least liked overall. Invert syrup yogurt was also the most effective in promoting the growth of the probiotic lactobacilli. However, the honey-sweetened yogurts had a more favourable fermentation metabolite profile, especially the lactic and propionic acids, as estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses. The probiotic counts in AMFTM 15+ manuka honey yogurt (7 log cfu/mL) were significantly higher than the other honey yogurt types (Manuka Blend and UMFTM 18+) and above the recommended threshold levels. The combination thus can be developed as a synbiotic functional food by further improving the sensory and physicochemical properties such as texture, apparent viscosity and water holding capacity. View Full-Text
Keywords: consumer acceptance; probiotic; prebiotic; manuka honey; yogurt; physico-chemical; 1H-13C HSQC NMR; fermentation metabolites consumer acceptance; probiotic; prebiotic; manuka honey; yogurt; physico-chemical; 1H-13C HSQC NMR; fermentation metabolites
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mohan, A.; Hadi, J.; Gutierrez-Maddox, N.; Li, Y.; Leung, I.K.H.; Gao, Y.; Shu, Q.; Quek, S.-Y. Sensory, Microbiological and Physicochemical Characterisation of Functional Manuka Honey Yogurts Containing Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DPC16. Foods 2020, 9, 106. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010106

AMA Style

Mohan A, Hadi J, Gutierrez-Maddox N, Li Y, Leung IKH, Gao Y, Shu Q, Quek S-Y. Sensory, Microbiological and Physicochemical Characterisation of Functional Manuka Honey Yogurts Containing Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DPC16. Foods. 2020; 9(1):106. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010106

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mohan, Anand, Joshua Hadi, Noemi Gutierrez-Maddox, Yu Li, Ivanhoe K.H. Leung, Yihuai Gao, Quan Shu, and Siew-Young Quek. 2020. "Sensory, Microbiological and Physicochemical Characterisation of Functional Manuka Honey Yogurts Containing Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DPC16" Foods 9, no. 1: 106. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010106

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