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Open AccessArticle

Important Sensory, Association, and Postprandial Perception Attributes Influencing Young Taiwanese Consumers’ Acceptance for Taiwanese Specialty Teas

1
Department of Food Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 666, Buzih Rd., Beitun Dist., Taichung City 40601, Taiwan
2
Department of Chinese Culinary Arts, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, No. 1, Songhe Rd., Xiaogang Dist., Kaohsiung City 81271, Taiwan
3
Department of Food Science, China University of Science and Technology, No. 245, Academia Rd. Sec. 3, Nangang Dist., Taipei City 115, Taiwan
4
Sinew Consulting Group Ltd., No. 26, Ln. 25, Shipin Rd., East Dist., Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan
5
Hospitality and Tourism Research Center, National Kaohsiung University of Hospitality and Tourism, Kaohsiung City 81271, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2020, 9(1), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010100
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 2 January 2020 / Accepted: 5 January 2020 / Published: 18 January 2020
For hundreds of years, Taiwan has been famous for its various specialty teas. The sensory features of these teas have been well specialized and standardized through sensory evaluations performed by tea experts in yearly competitions throughout history. However, the question arises of whether young Taiwanese consumers, whose dietary behaviors have become Westernized, agree with the conventional sensory standards and association/postprandial concepts in the traditional tea market of Taiwan. To study young Taiwanese consumers’ ideas towards traditional specialty teas, this research recruited 109 respondents, younger than the age of 30, to taste seven Taiwanese specialty tea infusions of various degrees of fermentation, and their opinions were gathered by questionnaires composed of check-all-that-apply (CATA) questions and hedonic scales. Through statistical analyses, we found that several tea sensory attributes which were emphasized in experts’ descriptive sensory evaluations were not appreciated by the young Taiwanese people. Instead, tea aroma and late sweetness/palatable/smooth/refreshing mouthfeels were the most important sensory attributes contributing to their tea preference. Overall, there would generally be no problem in serving young Taiwanese consumers lightly-fermented oolong teas that generate the highest digestive and lowest heartburn postprandial perceptions. View Full-Text
Keywords: CATA; sensory attributes; association attributes; postprandial perception attributes; teas (Camellia sinensis); degrees of fermentation CATA; sensory attributes; association attributes; postprandial perception attributes; teas (Camellia sinensis); degrees of fermentation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liou, B.-K.; Jaw, Y.-M.; Chuang, G.C.-C.; Yau, N.N.J.; Zhuang, Z.-Y.; Wang, L.-F. Important Sensory, Association, and Postprandial Perception Attributes Influencing Young Taiwanese Consumers’ Acceptance for Taiwanese Specialty Teas. Foods 2020, 9, 100. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010100

AMA Style

Liou B-K, Jaw Y-M, Chuang GC-C, Yau NNJ, Zhuang Z-Y, Wang L-F. Important Sensory, Association, and Postprandial Perception Attributes Influencing Young Taiwanese Consumers’ Acceptance for Taiwanese Specialty Teas. Foods. 2020; 9(1):100. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010100

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liou, Bo-Kang; Jaw, Yih-Mon; Chuang, George C.-C.; Yau, Newton N.J.; Zhuang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Li-Fei. 2020. "Important Sensory, Association, and Postprandial Perception Attributes Influencing Young Taiwanese Consumers’ Acceptance for Taiwanese Specialty Teas" Foods 9, no. 1: 100. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010100

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