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Open AccessArticle

Phytosterol Contents of Edible Oils and Their Contributions to Estimated Phytosterol Intake in the Chinese Diet

by Ruinan Yang 1,2, Li Xue 1,2, Liangxiao Zhang 1,3,4,*, Xuefang Wang 1,4, Xin Qi 1,4, Jun Jiang 1,4, Li Yu 1,4, Xiupin Wang 1,4, Wen Zhang 1,4,5, Qi Zhang 1,4,5 and Peiwu Li 1,3,4,5
1
Oil Crops Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan 430062, China
2
Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Improvement of Oil Crops, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Wuhan 430062, China
3
Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Oilseed Products (Wuhan), Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Wuhan 430062, China
4
Quality Inspection and Test Center for Oilseed Products, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Wuhan 430062, China
5
Key Laboratory of Detection for Mycotoxins, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Wuhan 430062, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(8), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080334
Received: 8 July 2019 / Revised: 1 August 2019 / Accepted: 7 August 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality and Functionality of Plant Foods)
Phytosterols are important micronutrients in human diets. Evidence has shown that phytosterols play an essential role in the reduction of cholesterol in blood and therefore decrease cardiovascular morbidity. In this study, the content and composition of phytosterols in different kinds of vegetable oils were analyzed, and the total phytosterol intake and contribution of foods to intake were estimated based on consumption data. The results showed that the phytosterol contents of rice bran oil, corn oil, and rapeseed oil were higher than those of other vegetable oils and the intake of phytosterol in the Chinese diet was about 392.3 mg/day. The main sources of phytosterols were edible vegetable oils (46.3%), followed by cereals (38.9%), vegetables (9.2%), nuts (2.0%), fruits (1.5%), beans and bean products (1.4%), and tubers (0.8%). Among all vegetable oils, rapeseed oil was the main individual contributor to phytosterol intake (22.9%), especially for the southern residents of China. View Full-Text
Keywords: phytosterols; vegetable oils; foods; China; dietary intake phytosterols; vegetable oils; foods; China; dietary intake
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, R.; Xue, L.; Zhang, L.; Wang, X.; Qi, X.; Jiang, J.; Yu, L.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Q.; Li, P. Phytosterol Contents of Edible Oils and Their Contributions to Estimated Phytosterol Intake in the Chinese Diet. Foods 2019, 8, 334.

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