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Narrow-Banded UVB Affects the Stability of Secondary Plant Metabolites in Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) and Pea (Pisum sativum) Leaves Being Added to Lentil Flour Fortified Bread: A Novel Approach for Producing Functional Foods

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Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops (IGZ) e.V., Theodor-Echtermeyer-Weg 1, 14979 Grossbeeren, Germany
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NutriAct – Competence Cluster Nutrition Research Berlin-Potsdam, Nuthetal, 14558, Germany
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Institute for Food Chemistry, Hamburg School of Food Science, Universität Hamburg, Grindelallee 117, 20146 Hamburg, Germany
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Germany Department of Food Chemistry, University of Potsdam, Institute of Nutritional Science, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
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Institute for Food and Environmental Research (ILU) e. V., Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 40-41, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
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Division Quality and Sensory of Plant Products, Department of Crop Sciences, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Carl-Sprengel-Weg 1, 37075 Goettingen, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(10), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100427
Received: 28 August 2019 / Revised: 13 September 2019 / Accepted: 16 September 2019 / Published: 20 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods)
Young kale and pea leaves are rich in secondary plant metabolites (SPMs) whose profile can be affected by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Carotenoids and flavonoids in kale and pea exposed to narrow-banded UVB, produced by innovative light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and subsequently used for breadmaking were investigated for the first time, thus combining two important strategies to increase the SPMs intake. Breads were also fortified with protein-rich lentil flour. Antioxidant activity in the ‘vegetable breads’ indicated health-promoting effects. Lentil flour increased the antioxidant activity in all of the ‘vegetable breads’. While carotenoids and chlorophylls showed a minor response to UVB treatment, kaempferol glycosides decreased in favor of increasing quercetin glycosides, especially in kale. Additionally, breadmaking caused major decreases in carotenoids and a conversion of chlorophyll to bioactive degradation products. In ‘kale breads’ and ‘pea breads’, 20% and 84% of flavonoid glycosides were recovered. Thus, kale and pea leaves seem to be suitable natural ingredients for producing innovative Functional Foods. View Full-Text
Keywords: narrow-banded UVB; thermal processing; antioxidant activity; kale; pea; flavonoids; carotenoids narrow-banded UVB; thermal processing; antioxidant activity; kale; pea; flavonoids; carotenoids
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Klopsch, R.; Baldermann, S.; Voss, A.; Rohn, S.; Schreiner, M.; Neugart, S. Narrow-Banded UVB Affects the Stability of Secondary Plant Metabolites in Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica) and Pea (Pisum sativum) Leaves Being Added to Lentil Flour Fortified Bread: A Novel Approach for Producing Functional Foods. Foods 2019, 8, 427.

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