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Open AccessArticle

Impact of Commercial Oenotannin and Mannoprotein Products on the Chemical and Sensory Properties of Shiraz Wines Made from Sequentially Harvested Fruit

1
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
2
The Australian Research Council Training Centre for Innovative Wine Production, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
3
The Australian Wine Research Institute, P.O. Box 197, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia.
Foods 2018, 7(12), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7120204
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 12 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine Composition and Quality Analysis)
The tannin and polysaccharide profiles and therefore sensory properties of wine are influenced by fruit maturity at harvest, and practices employed during winemaking. This study investigated the extent to which commercial winemaking supplements (skin and seed tannins, and mannoprotein (MP)) can enhance the mouthfeel properties of red wine, in particular, wine made from grapes harvested before commercial ripeness (early-harvest). Supplements were added to wines made from Shiraz grapes harvested at 20.8 and 24.5 °Brix. The chemical composition and mouthfeel properties of wines were then determined by high performance liquid chromatography and descriptive analysis (DA), respectively. Wines made from riper grapes had higher levels of tannin than wines made from early-harvest grapes, but similar polysaccharide levels were observed. The addition of seed oenotannin yielded higher tannin levels than addition of skin oenotannin, particularly for wines made from early-harvest grapes. The DA panel perceived sensory differences between H1 and H2 wines, but could not perceive any effect of supplementation on wine mouthfeel properties, with the exception of a minor increase in sweetness, attributed to mannoprotein addition to H1 wines, even when MP was added to wines at 2.5 times the level recommended for use in Australia. View Full-Text
Keywords: additives; mannoprotein; polysaccharides; sensory evaluation; tannin; wine additives; mannoprotein; polysaccharides; sensory evaluation; tannin; wine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, S.; Bindon, K.; Bastian, S.; Wilkinson, K. Impact of Commercial Oenotannin and Mannoprotein Products on the Chemical and Sensory Properties of Shiraz Wines Made from Sequentially Harvested Fruit. Foods 2018, 7, 204. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7120204

AMA Style

Li S, Bindon K, Bastian S, Wilkinson K. Impact of Commercial Oenotannin and Mannoprotein Products on the Chemical and Sensory Properties of Shiraz Wines Made from Sequentially Harvested Fruit. Foods. 2018; 7(12):204. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7120204

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Sijing; Bindon, Keren; Bastian, Susan; Wilkinson, Kerry. 2018. "Impact of Commercial Oenotannin and Mannoprotein Products on the Chemical and Sensory Properties of Shiraz Wines Made from Sequentially Harvested Fruit" Foods 7, no. 12: 204. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7120204

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