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Article

Reinvigorating Modern Breadmaking Based on Ancient Practices and Plant Ingredients, with Implementation of a Physicochemical Approach

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Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Food Science and Technology, School of Agriculture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 235, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
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Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Research in Archaeology (LIRA), Department of Archaeology, School of History and Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
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Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Innovation, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (CIRI-AUTH), Balkan Center, Buildings A & B, 10th km Thessaloniki-Thermi Rd, P.O. Box 8318, 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Luca Serventi, Charles Brennan and Rana Mustafa
Foods 2021, 10(4), 789; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040789
Received: 28 February 2021 / Revised: 26 March 2021 / Accepted: 5 April 2021 / Published: 7 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physicochemical and Sensory Evaluation of Grain-Based Food)
In this study, the potential use of ancient plant ingredients in emerging bakery products based on possible prehistoric and/or ancient practices of grinding and breadmaking was explored. Various ancient grains, nuts and seeds (einkorn wheat, barley, acorn, lentil, poppy seeds, linseed) were ground using prehistoric grinding tool replicas. Barley-based sourdough prepared by multiple back-slopping steps was added to dough made from einkorn alone or mixed with the above ingredients (20% level) or commercial flours alone (common wheat, spelt, barley). Sieving analysis showed that 40% of the einkorn flour particles were >400 μm, whereas commercial barley and common wheat flours were finer. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that lentil flour exhibited higher melting peak temperature and lower apparent enthalpy of starch gelatinization. Among all bread formulations tested, barley dough exhibited the highest elastic modulus and complex viscosity, as determined by dynamic rheometry; einkorn breads fortified with linseed and barley had the softest and hardest crust, respectively, as indicated by texture analysis; and common wheat gave the highest loaf-specific volume. Barley sourdough inclusion into einkorn dough did not affect the extent of starch retrogradation in the baked product. Generally, incorporation of ancient plant ingredients into contemporary bread formulations seems to be feasible. View Full-Text
Keywords: prehistoric grinding practices; ancient grain flours; breadmaking; starch gelatinization; dough rheology; bread quality parameters prehistoric grinding practices; ancient grain flours; breadmaking; starch gelatinization; dough rheology; bread quality parameters
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sereti, V.; Lazaridou, A.; Biliaderis, C.G.; Valamoti, S.M. Reinvigorating Modern Breadmaking Based on Ancient Practices and Plant Ingredients, with Implementation of a Physicochemical Approach. Foods 2021, 10, 789. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040789

AMA Style

Sereti V, Lazaridou A, Biliaderis CG, Valamoti SM. Reinvigorating Modern Breadmaking Based on Ancient Practices and Plant Ingredients, with Implementation of a Physicochemical Approach. Foods. 2021; 10(4):789. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040789

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sereti, Vasileia, Athina Lazaridou, Costas G. Biliaderis, and Soultana M. Valamoti. 2021. "Reinvigorating Modern Breadmaking Based on Ancient Practices and Plant Ingredients, with Implementation of a Physicochemical Approach" Foods 10, no. 4: 789. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040789

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