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Article

Characterization of Escherichia coli from Edible Insect Species: Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Isolate

1
Institute for Veterinary Food Science, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Frankfurter Str. 92, 35392 Giessen, Germany
2
Lower Saxony State Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety, 26203 Wardenburg, Germany
3
Institute for Food Quality and Food Safety, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover, Germany
4
Institute of Veterinary Sciences & Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou 310058, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Victor Benno Meyer-Rochow and Chuleui Jung
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2552; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112552
Received: 29 September 2021 / Accepted: 20 October 2021 / Published: 22 October 2021
Insects as novel foods are gaining popularity in Europe. Regulation (EU) 2015/2283 laid the framework for the application process to market food insects in member states, but potential hazards are still being evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate samples of edible insect species for the presence of antimicrobial-resistant and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Twenty-one E. coli isolates, recovered from samples of five different edible insect species, were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, PCR-based phylotyping, and macrorestriction analysis. The presence of genes associated with antimicrobial resistance or virulence, including stx1, stx2, and eae, was investigated by PCR. All isolates were subjected to genome sequencing, multilocus sequence typing, and serotype prediction. The isolates belonged either to phylogenetic group A, comprising mostly commensal E. coli, or group B1. One O178:H7 isolate, recovered from a Zophobas atratus sample, was identified as a STEC. A single isolate was resistant to tetracyclines and carried the tet(B) gene. Overall, this study shows that STEC can be present in edible insects, representing a potential health hazard. In contrast, the low resistance rate among the isolates indicates a low risk for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli to consumers. View Full-Text
Keywords: Shiga toxin; Escherichia coli; antimicrobial resistance; edible insects Shiga toxin; Escherichia coli; antimicrobial resistance; edible insects
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MDPI and ACS Style

Müller, A.; Seinige, D.; Grabowski, N.T.; Ahlfeld, B.; Yue, M.; Kehrenberg, C. Characterization of Escherichia coli from Edible Insect Species: Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Isolate. Foods 2021, 10, 2552. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112552

AMA Style

Müller A, Seinige D, Grabowski NT, Ahlfeld B, Yue M, Kehrenberg C. Characterization of Escherichia coli from Edible Insect Species: Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Isolate. Foods. 2021; 10(11):2552. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112552

Chicago/Turabian Style

Müller, Anja, Diana Seinige, Nils T. Grabowski, Birte Ahlfeld, Min Yue, and Corinna Kehrenberg. 2021. "Characterization of Escherichia coli from Edible Insect Species: Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Isolate" Foods 10, no. 11: 2552. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112552

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