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Open AccessArticle

Penicillin Allergy Assessment and Skin Testing in the Outpatient Setting

1
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Binghamton University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binghamton, NY 13902, USA
2
Department of Medicine, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
3
Department of Pharmacy, State University of New York Upstate University Hospital, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
4
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
5
Department of Pharmacy, Prisma Health Richland Hospital, Columbia, SC 29203, USA
6
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Wegmans School of Pharmacy, St. John Fisher College, Rochester, NY 14618, USA
7
Department of Pharmacy, St. Josephs Health, Syracuse, NY 13203, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pharmacy 2019, 7(3), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy7030136
Received: 31 July 2019 / Revised: 5 September 2019 / Accepted: 12 September 2019 / Published: 19 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Allergies)
Penicillin allergies are among of the most commonly reported allergies, yet only 10% of these patients are truly allergic. This leads to potential inadvertent negative consequences for patients and makes treatment decisions challenging for clinicians. Thus, allergy assessment and penicillin skin testing (PST) are important management strategies to reconcile and clarify labeled penicillin allergies. While PST is more common in the inpatient setting where the results will immediately impact antibiotic management, this process is becoming of increasing importance in the outpatient setting. PST in the outpatient setting allows clinicians to proactively de-label and educate patients accordingly so beta-lactam antibiotics may be appropriately prescribed when necessary for future infections. While allergists have primarily been responsible for PST in the outpatient setting, there is an increasing role for pharmacist involvement in the process. This review highlights the importance of penicillin allergy assessments, considerations for PST in the outpatient setting, education and advocacy for patients and clinicians, and the pharmacist’s role in outpatient PST. View Full-Text
Keywords: penicillin; allergy; skin testing; outpatient; pharmacist; antimicrobial stewardship penicillin; allergy; skin testing; outpatient; pharmacist; antimicrobial stewardship
MDPI and ACS Style

Kufel, W.D.; Justo, J.A.; Bookstaver, P.B.; Avery, L.M. Penicillin Allergy Assessment and Skin Testing in the Outpatient Setting. Pharmacy 2019, 7, 136.

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