Next Article in Journal
Priming of Defense Systems and Upregulation of MYC2 and JAZ1 Genes after Botrytis cinerea Inoculation in Methyl Jasmonate-Treated Strawberry Fruits
Next Article in Special Issue
DNA Fingerprinting and Species Identification Uncovers the Genetic Diversity of Katsouni Pea in the Greek Islands Amorgos and Schinoussa
Previous Article in Journal
Transcriptomic Response to Water Deficit Reveals a Crucial Role of Phosphate Acquisition in a Drought-Tolerant Common Bean Landrace
Previous Article in Special Issue
Patterns of Genetic Diversity in Highly Invasive Species: Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) Expansion in the Invaded Range of the Southern United States (US)
Review

Progress and Challenges in Ex Situ Conservation of Forage Germplasm: Grasses, Herbaceous Legumes and Fodder Trees

1
International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 5689, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2
School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, PO Box 237, Reading RG6 6AR, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(4), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040446
Received: 19 February 2020 / Revised: 11 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 2 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Biodiversity and Genetic Resources)
Forages provide an important livestock feed resource globally, particularly for millions of smallholder farmers, and have important roles in natural resource management and carbon sequestration, reducing soil erosion and mitigating the effects of climate change. Forage germplasm remains the basis for the selection and development of new, higher-yielding and better adaptedgenotypes to meet the increasing demand for livestock feed. Rapid rates of genetic erosion of forage diversity due to land-use change from natural pastures and rangelands to crop production to meet the food security requirements of a growing global population, together with pressures from a changing climate, highlight the necessity for ex situ seed conservation of forage genetic resources to provide germplasm for use by future generations. Whilst many forage species have orthodox seeds, the diverse range of genera and species which provide forage is a challenge in terms of the wide scope of information and understanding on conservation methods that genebank managers require—particularly for tropical forages, many of which are comparatively under-researched. We review the challenges to the conservation of tropical forage species by seed in ex situ genebanks and provide information on optimum methods for their management. View Full-Text
Keywords: genebanks; forage germplasm; grasses; legumes; seed storage; conservation; seed longevity; seed germination; monitoring; regeneration genebanks; forage germplasm; grasses; legumes; seed storage; conservation; seed longevity; seed germination; monitoring; regeneration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hanson, J.; Ellis, R.H. Progress and Challenges in Ex Situ Conservation of Forage Germplasm: Grasses, Herbaceous Legumes and Fodder Trees. Plants 2020, 9, 446. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040446

AMA Style

Hanson J, Ellis RH. Progress and Challenges in Ex Situ Conservation of Forage Germplasm: Grasses, Herbaceous Legumes and Fodder Trees. Plants. 2020; 9(4):446. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040446

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hanson, Jean; Ellis, Richard H. 2020. "Progress and Challenges in Ex Situ Conservation of Forage Germplasm: Grasses, Herbaceous Legumes and Fodder Trees" Plants 9, no. 4: 446. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040446

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop