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Open AccessArticle

Lipid Thermal Fingerprints of Long-term Stored Seeds of Brassicaceae

1
Departamento de Biotecnología-Biología Vegetal, E.T.S.I. Agronómica, Alimentaria y de Biosistemas. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Wellcome Trust Millennium Building, Wakehurst, Ardingly, West Sussex RH17 6TN, UK
3
The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Private Bag 11600, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(10), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8100414
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 24 September 2019 / Accepted: 28 September 2019 / Published: 14 October 2019
Thermal fingerprints for seeds of 20 crop wild relatives of Brassicaceae stored for 8 to 44 years at the Plant Germplasm Bank—Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank—were generated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and analyzed in relation to storage stability. Relatively poor storing oily seeds at −20 °C tended to have lipids with crystallization and melting transitions spread over a wide temperature range (c. 40 °C) that spanned the storage temperature, plus a melting end temperature of around 15 °C. We postulated that in dry storage, the variable longevity in Brassicaceae seeds could be associated with the presence of a metastable lipid phase at the temperature at which they are being stored. Consistent with that, when high-quality seed samples of various species were assessed after banking at −5 to −10 °C for c. 40 years, melting end temperatures were observed to be much lower (c. 0 to −30 °C) and multiple lipid phases did not occur at the storage temperature. We conclude that multiple features of the seed lipid thermal fingerprint could be used as biophysical markers to predict potential poor performance of oily seeds during long-term, decadal storage. View Full-Text
Keywords: crop wild relatives; longevity; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); seed banking; conservation crop wild relatives; longevity; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); seed banking; conservation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mira, S.; Nadarajan, J.; Liu, U.; González-Benito, M.E.; Pritchard, H.W. Lipid Thermal Fingerprints of Long-term Stored Seeds of Brassicaceae. Plants 2019, 8, 414. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8100414

AMA Style

Mira S, Nadarajan J, Liu U, González-Benito ME, Pritchard HW. Lipid Thermal Fingerprints of Long-term Stored Seeds of Brassicaceae. Plants. 2019; 8(10):414. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8100414

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mira, Sara; Nadarajan, Jayanthi; Liu, Udayangani; González-Benito, Maria E.; Pritchard, Hugh W. 2019. "Lipid Thermal Fingerprints of Long-term Stored Seeds of Brassicaceae" Plants 8, no. 10: 414. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8100414

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