Next Article in Journal
Landslide Susceptibility Mapping Based on Weighted Gradient Boosting Decision Tree in Wanzhou Section of the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (China)
Next Article in Special Issue
Gender and Age Differences in Using Indoor Maps for Wayfinding in Real Environments
Previous Article in Journal
Mapping Long-Term Dynamics of Population and Dwellings Based on a Multi-Temporal Analysis of Urban Morphologies
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evaluation of User Performance in Interactive and Static 3D Maps
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8010003

Collaborative Immersive Virtual Environments for Education in Geography

1
Division of Information and Library Studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, 60200 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Department of Geography, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno, Czech Republic
3
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, 60200 Brno, Czech Republic
4
Department of Visual Computing, Faculty of Informatics, Masaryk University, 60200 Brno, Czech Republic
5
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, 60200 Brno, Czech Republic
6
Department of Geography, Faculty of Education, Masaryk University, 60300 Brno, Czech Republic
7
HUME Lab, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University, 60200 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 1 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 23 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Aspects of Human-Computer Interaction for GIS)
Full-Text   |   PDF [3886 KB, uploaded 24 December 2018]   |  

Abstract

Immersive virtual reality (iVR) devices are rapidly becoming an important part of our lives and forming a new way for people to interact with computers and each other. The impact and consequences of this innovative technology have not yet been satisfactory explored. This empirical study investigated the cognitive and social aspects of collaboration in a shared, immersive virtual reality. A unique application for implementing a collaborative immersive virtual environment (CIVE) was developed by our interdisciplinary team as a software solution for educational purposes, with two scenarios for learning about hypsography, i.e., explanations of contour line principles. Both scenarios allow switching between a usual 2D contour map and a 3D model of the corresponding terrain to increase the intelligibility and clarity of the educational content. Gamification principles were also applied to both scenarios to augment user engagement during the completion of tasks. A qualitative research approach was adopted to obtain a deep insight into the lived experience of users in a CIVE. It was thus possible to form a deep understanding of very new subject matter. Twelve pairs of participants were observed during their CIVE experience and then interviewed either in a semistructured interview or a focus group. Data from these three research techniques were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which is research method for studying individual experience. Four superordinate themes—with detailed descriptions of experiences shared by numerous participants—emerged as results from the analysis; we called these (1) Appreciation for having a collaborator, (2) The Surprising “Fun with Maps”, (3) Communication as a challenge, and (4) Cognition in two realities. The findings of the study indicate the importance of the social dimension during education in a virtual environment and the effectiveness of dynamic and interactive 3D visualization. View Full-Text
Keywords: immersive virtual reality; collaborative immersive virtual environment; immersion; sense of presence; telepresence; Head-mounted display; cyberpsychology; human–computer interaction; collaborative learning; hypsography; contour lines; map literacy immersive virtual reality; collaborative immersive virtual environment; immersion; sense of presence; telepresence; Head-mounted display; cyberpsychology; human–computer interaction; collaborative learning; hypsography; contour lines; map literacy
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Šašinka, Č.; Stachoň, Z.; Sedlák, M.; Chmelík, J.; Herman, L.; Kubíček, P.; Šašinková, A.; Doležal, M.; Tejkl, H.; Urbánek, T.; Svatoňová, H.; Ugwitz, P.; Juřík, V. Collaborative Immersive Virtual Environments for Education in Geography. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8, 3.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. EISSN 2220-9964 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top