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Open AccessArticle

UPLC–MS Triglyceride Profiling in Sunflower and Rapeseed Seeds

1
Center of Life Sciences, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel st. 3, Building 1, Moscow 121205, Russia
2
Institute for Information Transmission Problems (Kharkevich Institute), Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127051, Russia
3
Faculty of Computer Science, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow 119991, Russia
4
Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkin st. 3, Moscow 119991, Russia
5
Pustovoit All-Russia Research Institute of Oil Crops, Filatova st. 17, Krasnodar 350038, Russia
6
Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1, Building 40, Moscow 119234, Russia
7
All-Russia Rice Research Institute, Belozerny 3, Krasnodar 350921, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Center of Life Sciences, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel st. 3, Moscow 121205, Russia.
Biomolecules 2019, 9(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9010009
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 13 December 2018 / Published: 27 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipidomics)
Sunflower and rapeseed are among the most important sources of vegetable oil for food and industry. The main components of vegetable oil are triglycerides (TAGs) (about 97%). Ultra- performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS) profiling of TAGs in sunflower and rapeseed has been performed and the TAG profiles obtained for these species have been compared. It has been identified that 34 TAGs are shared by sunflower and rapeseed. It was demonstrated that TAGs 52:2, 52:5, 52:6, 54:3; 54:4, 54:7, 56:3, 56:4, and 56:5 had the highest variability levels between sunflower and rapeseed with the higher presence in rapeseed. TAGs 50:2, 52:3, 52:4, 54:5, and 54:6 also showed high variability, but were the most abundant in sunflower. Moreover, the differences in TAG composition between the winter-type and spring-type rapeseed have been revealed, which may be associated with freezing tolerance. It was shown that winter-type rapeseed seeds contain TAGs with a lower degree of saturation, while in spring-type rapeseed highly saturated lipids are the most abundant. These findings may give new insights into the cold resistance mechanisms in plants the understanding of which is especially important in terms of global climate changes. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultraperformance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS); triglycerides; sunflower; rapeseed; winter-type rapeseed; spring-type rapeseed; cold resistance; freezing tolerance ultraperformance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS); triglycerides; sunflower; rapeseed; winter-type rapeseed; spring-type rapeseed; cold resistance; freezing tolerance
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Chernova, A.; Gubaev, R.; Mazin, P.; Goryunova, S.; Demurin, Y.; Gorlova, L.; Vanushkina, A.; Mair, W.; Anikanov, N.; Martynova, E.; Goryunov, D.; Garkusha, S.; Mukhina, Z.; Khaytovich, P. UPLC–MS Triglyceride Profiling in Sunflower and Rapeseed Seeds. Biomolecules 2019, 9, 9.

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