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Anion Inhibition Profile of the β-Carbonic Anhydrase from the Opportunist Pathogenic Fungus Malassezia restricta Involved in Dandruff and Seborrheic Dermatitis
Open AccessArticle

Sulfonamide Inhibition Profile of the β-Carbonic Anhydrase from Malassezia restricta, An Opportunistic Pathogen Triggering Scalp Conditions

1
Institute of Biosciences and Bioresources, CNR, Via Pietro Castellino 111, 80131 Napoli, Italy
2
Section of Pharmaceutical and Nutraceutical Sciences, Department of Neurofarb, University of Florence, Via U. Schiff 6, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, Italy
3
L’Oréal Research and Innovation, 93601 Aulnay-sous-Bois, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metabolites 2020, 10(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10010039
Received: 17 December 2019 / Revised: 13 January 2020 / Accepted: 16 January 2020 / Published: 16 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbonic Anhydrases and Metabolism Volume 2)
The critical CO2 hydration reaction to bicarbonate and protons is catalyzed by carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1). Their physiological role is to assist the transport of the CO2 and HCO3 at the cellular level, which will not be ensured by the low velocity of the uncatalyzed reaction. CA inhibition may impair the growth of microorganisms. In the yeasts, Candida albicans and Malassezia globosa, the activity of the unique β-CA identified in their genomes was demonstrated to be essential for growth of the pathogen. Here, we decided to investigate the sulfonamide inhibition profile of the homologous β-CA (MreCA) identified in the genome of Malassezia restricta, an opportunistic pathogen triggering dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. Among 40 investigated derivatives, the best MreCA sulfonamide inhibitors were dorzolamide, brinzolamide, indisulam, valdecoxib, sulthiam, and acetazolamide (KI < 1.0 μM). The MreCA inhibition profile was different from those of the homologous enzyme from Malassezia globosa (MgCA) and the human isoenzymes (hCA I and hCA II). These results might be useful to for designing CA inhibitor scaffolds that may selectively inhibit the dandruff-producing fungi. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbonic anhydrases; metalloenzymes; sulfonamides; CA inhibitors; Malassezia restricta; Malassezia globosa; dandruff; seborrheic dermatitis carbonic anhydrases; metalloenzymes; sulfonamides; CA inhibitors; Malassezia restricta; Malassezia globosa; dandruff; seborrheic dermatitis
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Del Prete, S.; Angeli, A.; Ghobril, C.; Hitce, J.; Clavaud, C.; Marat, X.; Supuran, C.T.; Capasso, C. Sulfonamide Inhibition Profile of the β-Carbonic Anhydrase from Malassezia restricta, An Opportunistic Pathogen Triggering Scalp Conditions. Metabolites 2020, 10, 39.

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