Previous Article in Journal
Performance and Tolerability of a New Topical Dexpanthenol-Containing Emollient Line in Subjects with Dry Skin: Results from Three Randomized Studies
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nitric Oxide Generating Formulation as an Innovative Approach to Topical Skin Care: An Open-Label Pilot Study
Open AccessArticle

Intention to Purchase Halal Cosmetics: Do Males and Females Differ? A Multigroup Analysis

1
Faculty of Business, Economy and Social Development, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, Kuala Nerus 21030, Malaysia
2
College of Arts and Sciences, University of Nizwa, Ad Dakhiliyah, Birkat Al Mouz, Nizwa PC 616, Oman
3
College of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Korea
4
Hailey College of Banking and Finance, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
5
Department of Marketing, Digital Marketing, Faculty of Business, Applied Science Private University, Amman 11931, Jordan
6
Department of Hotel and Leisure Management, Pai Chai University, Daejeon 35345, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cosmetics 2021, 8(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010019
Received: 24 December 2020 / Revised: 14 February 2021 / Accepted: 16 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Cosmetics in 2020)
As Muslims bound to Islamic teachings, the attitude of young millennials preferring non-halal international cosmetics is trivial. Despite the acceptance of halal food, literature on the acceptance of halal cosmetics remains scarce. The intention to purchase halal cosmetics is crucial for the sustainability of halal cosmetics manufacturers. The authors used the theory of planned behavior to identify factors influencing the purchase intention of halal cosmetics among Muslim millennials. Since cosmetics are not exclusively used by females, as males are starting to use them in their daily lives, gender was incorporated into the framework to assess its moderating effect on the relationship. Furthermore, brand image was included in the theory of planned behavior. Data were collected from three universities in Malaysia. A total of 501 responses were analyzed with smart partial least squares to run a multigroup analysis. The analysis revealed that subjective norms have a stronger effect on females, and perceived behavioral control has a greater effect on males. Although attitude and brand image have a positive effect on the intention to purchase halal cosmetics, gender has no effect. The findings are essential for halal cosmetics manufacturers to craft a marketing strategy aimed at Muslim millennials in Malaysia. View Full-Text
Keywords: intention to purchase; halal cosmetics; multi-group analysis; millennials intention to purchase; halal cosmetics; multi-group analysis; millennials
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Ngah, A.H.; Gabarre, S.; Han, H.; Rahi, S.; Al-Gasawneh, J.A.; Park, S.-h. Intention to Purchase Halal Cosmetics: Do Males and Females Differ? A Multigroup Analysis. Cosmetics 2021, 8, 19. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010019

AMA Style

Ngah AH, Gabarre S, Han H, Rahi S, Al-Gasawneh JA, Park S-h. Intention to Purchase Halal Cosmetics: Do Males and Females Differ? A Multigroup Analysis. Cosmetics. 2021; 8(1):19. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010019

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ngah, Abdul H.; Gabarre, Serge; Han, Heesup; Rahi, Samar; Al-Gasawneh, Jassim A.; Park, Su-hyun. 2021. "Intention to Purchase Halal Cosmetics: Do Males and Females Differ? A Multigroup Analysis" Cosmetics 8, no. 1: 19. https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8010019

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop