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Open AccessReview

A Novel Model of Cancer Drug Resistance: Oncosomal Release of Cytotoxic and Antibody-Based Drugs

1
Department of Dental Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8525, Japan
2
Advanced Research Center for Oral and Craniofacial Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8525, Japan
3
Department of Medical Bioengineering, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
4
Department of Biochemistry, Ain Shams University Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566, Egypt
5
Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
6
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-0914, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed to this work equally.
Biology 2020, 9(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9030047
Received: 17 December 2019 / Revised: 23 February 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 5 March 2020
Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes or oncosomes, often carry oncogenic molecules derived from tumor cells. In addition, accumulating evidence indicates that tumor cells can eject anti-cancer drugs such as chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs within EVs, a novel mechanism of drug resistance. The EV-releasing drug resistance phenotype is often coupled with cellular dedifferentiation and transformation in cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the adoption of a cancer stem cell phenotype. The release of EVs is also involved in immunosuppression. Herein, we address different aspects by which EVs modulate the tumor microenvironment to become resistant to anticancer and antibody-based drugs, as well as the concept of the resistance-associated secretory phenotype (RASP). View Full-Text
Keywords: extracellular vesicle (EV); exosome; oncosome; drug resistance; epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); heat shock protein (HSP); cell stress response; resistance-associated secretory phenotype (RASP); hypoxia; acidosis; tumor immunology extracellular vesicle (EV); exosome; oncosome; drug resistance; epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); heat shock protein (HSP); cell stress response; resistance-associated secretory phenotype (RASP); hypoxia; acidosis; tumor immunology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Eguchi, T.; Taha, E.A.; Calderwood, S.K.; Ono, K. A Novel Model of Cancer Drug Resistance: Oncosomal Release of Cytotoxic and Antibody-Based Drugs. Biology 2020, 9, 47. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9030047

AMA Style

Eguchi T, Taha EA, Calderwood SK, Ono K. A Novel Model of Cancer Drug Resistance: Oncosomal Release of Cytotoxic and Antibody-Based Drugs. Biology. 2020; 9(3):47. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9030047

Chicago/Turabian Style

Eguchi, Takanori; Taha, Eman A.; Calderwood, Stuart K.; Ono, Kisho. 2020. "A Novel Model of Cancer Drug Resistance: Oncosomal Release of Cytotoxic and Antibody-Based Drugs" Biology 9, no. 3: 47. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9030047

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