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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

The Pulsed Electron Deposition Technique for Biomedical Applications: A Review

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Department of Chemistry “Giacomo Ciamician” and INSTM UdR of Bologna, University of Bologna, via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna, Italy
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Interdepartmental Center for Industrial Research on Advanced Applications in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Technology, CIRI-MAM, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna, Italy
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Health Sciences and Technologies (HST) CIRI, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 41/E, Ozzano dell’Emilia, 40064 Bologna, Italy
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Center for Translational Neurophysiology of Speech and Communication, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Fossato di Mortara 17–19, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
5
Life Science Department, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Campi 103, 41125 Modena, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2020, 10(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10010016
Received: 11 December 2019 / Revised: 19 December 2019 / Accepted: 23 December 2019 / Published: 25 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Vapor Deposited Biomedical Coatings)
The “pulsed electron deposition” (PED) technique, in which a solid target material is ablated by a fast, high-energy electron beam, was initially developed two decades ago for the deposition of thin films of metal oxides for photovoltaics, spintronics, memories, and superconductivity, and dielectric polymer layers. Recently, PED has been proposed for use in the biomedical field for the fabrication of hard and soft coatings. The first biomedical application was the deposition of low wear zirconium oxide coatings on the bearing components in total joint replacement. Since then, several works have reported the manufacturing and characterization of coatings of hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphate substituted (CaP), biogenic CaP, bioglass, and antibacterial coatings on both hard (metallic or ceramic) and soft (plastic or elastomeric) substrates. Due to the growing interest in PED, the current maturity of the technology and the low cost compared to other commonly used physical vapor deposition techniques, the purpose of this work was to review the principles of operation, the main applications, and the future perspectives of PED technology in medicine. View Full-Text
Keywords: pulsed electron deposition; thin films; orthopedic applications; bioactivity; ceramic coatings; yttria-stabilized zirconia; calcium phosphates; hydroxyapatite; biomimetic coatings; antibacterial coatings pulsed electron deposition; thin films; orthopedic applications; bioactivity; ceramic coatings; yttria-stabilized zirconia; calcium phosphates; hydroxyapatite; biomimetic coatings; antibacterial coatings
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Liguori, A.; Gualandi, C.; Focarete, M.L.; Biscarini, F.; Bianchi, M. The Pulsed Electron Deposition Technique for Biomedical Applications: A Review. Coatings 2020, 10, 16.

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