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Article

The Urinary Resistome of Clinically Healthy Companion Dogs: Potential One Health Implications

1
Veterinary Clinical Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, 611 E. Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766, USA
2
MiDOG LLC, 14672 Bentley Cir, Tustin, CA 92780, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Manuel San Andres
Antibiotics 2022, 11(6), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060780
Received: 1 May 2022 / Revised: 2 June 2022 / Accepted: 2 June 2022 / Published: 8 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Use in Veterinary)
An interdisciplinary approach to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is essential to effectively address what is projected to soon become a public health disaster. Veterinary medicine accounts for a majority of antimicrobial use, and mainly in support of industrial food animal production (IFAP), which has significant exposure implications for human and nonhuman animals. Companion dogs live in close proximity to humans and share environmental exposures, including food sources. This study aimed to elucidate the AMR-gene presence in microorganisms recovered from urine from clinically healthy dogs to highlight public health considerations in the context of a species-spanning framework. Urine was collected through cystocentesis from 50 companion dogs in Southern California, and microbial DNA was analyzed using next-generation sequencing. Thirteen AMR genes in urine from 48% of the dogs {n=24} were detected. The most common AMR genes were aph(3′)Ia, and ermB, which confer resistance to aminoglycosides and MLS (macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins) antibiotics, respectively. Antibiotic-resistance profiles based on the AMR genes detected, and the intrinsic resistance profiles of bacterial species, were inferred in 24% of the samples {n=12} for 57 species, with most belonging to Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Corynebacterium genera. The presence of AMR genes that confer resistance to medically important antibiotics suggests that dogs may serve as reservoirs of clinically relevant resistomes, which is likely rooted in excessive IFAP antimicrobial use. View Full-Text
Keywords: antimicrobial resistance; dog; urine; microbiome; resistome; species-spanning antimicrobial resistance; dog; urine; microbiome; resistome; species-spanning
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MDPI and ACS Style

Melgarejo, T.; Sharp, N.; Krumbeck, J.A.; Wu, G.; Kim, Y.J.; Linde, A. The Urinary Resistome of Clinically Healthy Companion Dogs: Potential One Health Implications. Antibiotics 2022, 11, 780. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060780

AMA Style

Melgarejo T, Sharp N, Krumbeck JA, Wu G, Kim YJ, Linde A. The Urinary Resistome of Clinically Healthy Companion Dogs: Potential One Health Implications. Antibiotics. 2022; 11(6):780. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060780

Chicago/Turabian Style

Melgarejo, Tonatiuh, Nathan Sharp, Janina A. Krumbeck, Guangxi Wu, Young J. Kim, and Annika Linde. 2022. "The Urinary Resistome of Clinically Healthy Companion Dogs: Potential One Health Implications" Antibiotics 11, no. 6: 780. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060780

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