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Article

Free-Weight Resistance Exercise Is More Effective in Enhancing Inhibitory Control than Machine-Based Training: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

Department of Sports Medicine, Goethe University, Ginnheimer Landstraße 39, 60487 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
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Brain Sci. 2020, 10(10), 702; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10100702
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 28 September 2020 / Accepted: 28 September 2020 / Published: 3 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Studying Brain Activity in Sports Performance)
Resistance exercise has been demonstrated to improve brain function. However, the optimal workout characteristics are a matter of debate. This randomized, controlled trial aimed to elucidate differences between free-weight (REfree) and machine-based (REmach) training with regard to their ability to acutely enhance cognitive performance (CP). A total of n = 46 healthy individuals (27 ± 4 years, 26 men) performed a 45-min bout of REfree (military press, barbell squat, bench press) or REmach (shoulder press, leg press, chest press). Pre- and post-intervention, CP was examined using the Stroop test, Trail Making Test and Digit Span test. Mann–Whitney U tests did not reveal between-group differences for performance in the Digit Span test, Trail Making test and the color and word conditions of the Stroop test (p > 0.05). However, REfree was superior to REmach in the Stroop color-word condition (+6.3%, p = 0.02, R = 0.35). Additionally, REfree elicited pre-post changes in all parameters except for the Digit Span test and the word condition of the Stroop test while REmach only improved cognitive performance in part A of the Trail Making test. Using free weights seems to be the more effective RE method to acutely improve cognitive function (i.e., inhibitory control). The mechanisms of this finding merit further investigation. View Full-Text
Keywords: resistance training; cognition; barbell training; strength training resistance training; cognition; barbell training; strength training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wilke, J.; Stricker, V.; Usedly, S. Free-Weight Resistance Exercise Is More Effective in Enhancing Inhibitory Control than Machine-Based Training: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 702. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10100702

AMA Style

Wilke J, Stricker V, Usedly S. Free-Weight Resistance Exercise Is More Effective in Enhancing Inhibitory Control than Machine-Based Training: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Brain Sciences. 2020; 10(10):702. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10100702

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wilke, Jan, Vanessa Stricker, and Susanne Usedly. 2020. "Free-Weight Resistance Exercise Is More Effective in Enhancing Inhibitory Control than Machine-Based Training: A Randomized, Controlled Trial" Brain Sciences 10, no. 10: 702. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10100702

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