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Crossover Effect in Cement-Based Materials: A Review

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia
2
Department of Building Surveying, Faculty of Built Environment, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia
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Center for Building, Construction & Tropical Architecture (BuCTA), Faculty of Built Environment, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia
4
Centre for Advanced Concrete Technology (CACT), INTI International University, Nilai 71800, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(14), 2776; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9142776
Received: 5 May 2019 / Revised: 1 June 2019 / Accepted: 21 June 2019 / Published: 10 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low Binder Concrete and Mortars)
Cement-based materials (CBMs) such as pastes, mortars and concretes are the most frequently used building materials in the present construction industry. Cement hydration, along with the resulting compressive strength in these materials, is dependent on curing temperature, methods and duration. A concrete subjected to an initial higher curing temperature undergoes accelerated hydration by resulting in non-uniform scattering of the hydration products and consequently creating a great porosity at later ages. This phenomenon is called crossover effect (COE). The COE may occur even at early ages between seven to 10 days for Portland cements with various mineral compositions. Compressive strength and other mechanical properties are important for the long life of concrete structures, so any reduction in these properties is of great concern to engineers. This study aims to review existing information on COE phenomenon in CBMs and provide recommendations for future research. View Full-Text
Keywords: crossover effect; cementitious materials; compressive strength; accelerated curing; concrete; mortar crossover effect; cementitious materials; compressive strength; accelerated curing; concrete; mortar
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yousuf, S.; Shafigh, P.; Ibrahim, Z.; Hashim, H.; Panjehpour, M. Crossover Effect in Cement-Based Materials: A Review. Appl. Sci. 2019, 9, 2776.

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