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Article

Evaluating the Utility of UV Lamps to Mitigate the Spread of Pathogens in the ICU

1
Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital, Lake Forest, IL 60045, USA
2
Cedar Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA
3
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
4
Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
5
Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(18), 6326; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10186326
Received: 22 July 2020 / Revised: 28 August 2020 / Accepted: 9 September 2020 / Published: 11 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electromagnetic Radiation in Biology and Health)
Contaminated surfaces in a hospital serve as reservoirs for pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate UV lights in preventing the spread of a DNA tracer in an intensive care unit (ICU) through sterilization of highly touched surfaces. In a prospective trial, a non-pathogenic DNA virus was inoculated onto surfaces in an ICU patient room. Investigators swabbed frequently touched surfaces in non-inoculated ICU rooms at 24, 48, and 96 h post inoculation. Culture specimens were analyzed for the presence of viral DNA via PCR. After baseline data were obtained, UV lights were deployed in a standardized fashion onto vitals monitors, ventilators, keyboards, and intravenous (IV) pumps. Inoculation and culturing were then repeated. Prior to UV implementation, the DNA tracer disseminated to 10.10% of tested surfaces in non-inoculated rooms at 48 h. Post UV light deployment, only 1.20% of surfaces tested positive for the DNA tracer after 48 h. UV decontamination significantly retarded the spread of the virus DNA, with a relative reduction of 90% at 48 h from 10.10% of surfaces pre UV to 1.20% of surfaces post UV (p < 0.0001). UV decontamination holds the potential to confer protection to patients by reducing the number of surfaces that can serve as a nidus for transfer. View Full-Text
Keywords: UV light; tracer virus; UV-C; hospital acquired infection (HAI); UV sterilization UV light; tracer virus; UV-C; hospital acquired infection (HAI); UV sterilization
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gostine, A.; Gostine, D.; Short, J.; Rustagi, A.; Cadnum, J.; Donskey, C.; Angelotti, T. Evaluating the Utility of UV Lamps to Mitigate the Spread of Pathogens in the ICU. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 6326. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10186326

AMA Style

Gostine A, Gostine D, Short J, Rustagi A, Cadnum J, Donskey C, Angelotti T. Evaluating the Utility of UV Lamps to Mitigate the Spread of Pathogens in the ICU. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(18):6326. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10186326

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gostine, Andrew, David Gostine, Jack Short, Arjun Rustagi, Jennifer Cadnum, Curtis Donskey, and Tim Angelotti. 2020. "Evaluating the Utility of UV Lamps to Mitigate the Spread of Pathogens in the ICU" Applied Sciences 10, no. 18: 6326. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10186326

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