Next Article in Journal
Short- and Long-Term Biochar Cadmium and Lead Immobilization Mechanisms
Next Article in Special Issue
Foundry Sand Source Reduction Options: Life Cycle Assessment Evaluation
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Analysis on Urban Flood Countermeasures Based on Life Cycle Thinking: A Comparison between Enhancing of Drainage Capacity Project and Sponge City
Previous Article in Special Issue
Centralized and Decentralized Recycle Policy with Transboundary Pollution
Article

Decontaminating Terrestrial Oil Spills: A Comparative Assessment of Dog Fur, Human Hair, Peat Moss and Polypropylene Sorbents

School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Environments 2020, 7(7), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7070052
Received: 4 June 2020 / Revised: 30 June 2020 / Accepted: 4 July 2020 / Published: 8 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pollution Prevention/Environmental Sustainability for Industry)
Terrestrial oil spills have severe and continuing consequences for human communities and the natural environment. Sorbent materials are considered to be a first line of defense method for directly extracting oil from spills and preventing further contaminant spread, but little is known on the performance of sorbent products in terrestrial environments. Dog fur and human hair sorbent products were compared to peat moss and polypropylene sorbent to examine their relative effectiveness in adsorbing crude oil from different terrestrial surfaces. Crude oil spills were simulated using standardized microcosm experiments, and contaminant adsorbency was measured as percentage of crude oil removed from the original spilled quantity. Sustainable-origin absorbents made from dog fur and human hair were equally effective to polypropylene in extracting crude oil from non- and semi-porous land surfaces, with recycled dog fur products and loose-form hair showing a slight advantage over other sorbent types. In a sandy terrestrial environment, polypropylene sorbent was significantly better at adsorbing spilled crude oil than all other tested products. View Full-Text
Keywords: crude oil; petroleum contamination; disaster management; land pollution crude oil; petroleum contamination; disaster management; land pollution
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Murray, M.L.; Poulsen, S.M.; Murray, B.R. Decontaminating Terrestrial Oil Spills: A Comparative Assessment of Dog Fur, Human Hair, Peat Moss and Polypropylene Sorbents. Environments 2020, 7, 52. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7070052

AMA Style

Murray ML, Poulsen SM, Murray BR. Decontaminating Terrestrial Oil Spills: A Comparative Assessment of Dog Fur, Human Hair, Peat Moss and Polypropylene Sorbents. Environments. 2020; 7(7):52. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7070052

Chicago/Turabian Style

Murray, Megan L., Soeren M. Poulsen, and Brad R. Murray 2020. "Decontaminating Terrestrial Oil Spills: A Comparative Assessment of Dog Fur, Human Hair, Peat Moss and Polypropylene Sorbents" Environments 7, no. 7: 52. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7070052

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop