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Article

PCBs in Older Buildings: Measuring PCB Levels in Caulk and Window Glazing Materials in Older Buildings

US Environmental Protection Agency, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Exposure Methods and Measurement Division, P.O. Box 93478, Las Vegas, NV 89193-3478, USA
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Environments 2019, 6(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6020015
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 31 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis of Environmental Pollutants)
A method for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in caulk and glazing materials was developed and evaluated by application to a combination of 36 samples of caulk and glazing materials, from four schools in the northeastern area of the United States. Quality control analysis showed a range of 45 to 170% for spike recovery from the various samples and a range of 10.9 to 20.1% difference in precision among replicates. The result for the samples analyzed showed that three of the four schools sampled contained caulking and glazing materials with levels of PCBs >50 μg/g (range 54.6 μg/g to 445,000 μg/g). Across the four schools, 24% of collected caulk and glazing samples contained elevated PCB levels relative to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) bulk product waste criterion of 50 μg/g under “The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act.” The PCBs determined in the samples, exhibited characteristic chromatographic patterns similar to those of Aroclors 1242, 1248, 1254, 1260, 1262, and a 1016/1254 mix. View Full-Text
Keywords: PCB; Aroclor®; PCBs in schools; caulk samples; window glazing; extraction methods; pressurized liquid extraction; gas chromatography/electron capture detector (GC/ECD); Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) PCB; Aroclor®; PCBs in schools; caulk samples; window glazing; extraction methods; pressurized liquid extraction; gas chromatography/electron capture detector (GC/ECD); Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Osemwengie, L.I.; Morgan, J. PCBs in Older Buildings: Measuring PCB Levels in Caulk and Window Glazing Materials in Older Buildings. Environments 2019, 6, 15. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6020015

AMA Style

Osemwengie LI, Morgan J. PCBs in Older Buildings: Measuring PCB Levels in Caulk and Window Glazing Materials in Older Buildings. Environments. 2019; 6(2):15. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6020015

Chicago/Turabian Style

Osemwengie, Lantis I., and Jade Morgan. 2019. "PCBs in Older Buildings: Measuring PCB Levels in Caulk and Window Glazing Materials in Older Buildings" Environments 6, no. 2: 15. https://doi.org/10.3390/environments6020015

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