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Open AccessArticle

Atg5-Deficient Mice Infected with Francisella tularensis LVS Demonstrate Increased Survival and Less Severe Pathology in Internal Organs

1
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
2
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
3
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
4
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(10), 1531; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101531
Received: 18 September 2020 / Revised: 1 October 2020 / Accepted: 2 October 2020 / Published: 6 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tularemia: Pathogenesis, Diagnostic, Prevention, and Treatment)
Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen that proliferates within various cell types and can infect a multitude of animal species. Francisella escapes the phagosome rapidly after infection and reaches the host cell cytosol where bacteria undergo extensive replication. Once cytosolic, Francisella becomes a target of an autophagy-mediated process. The mechanisms by which autophagy plays a role in replication of this cytosolic pathogen have not been fully elucidated. In vitro, F. tularensis avoids degradation via autophagy and the autophagy process provides nutrients that support its intracellular replication, but the role of autophagy in vivo is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of tularemia by using transgenic mice deficient in Atg5 in the myeloid lineage. The infection of Atg5-deficient mice with Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS) resulted in increased survival, significantly reduced bacterial burden in the mouse organs, and less severe histopathological changes in the spleen, liver and lung tissues. The data highlight the contribution of Atg5 in the pathogenesis of tularemia in vivo. View Full-Text
Keywords: Francisella; Atg5; autophagy; mice Francisella; Atg5; autophagy; mice
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kelava, I.; Mihelčić, M.; Ožanič, M.; Marečić, V.; Knežević, M.; Ćurlin, M.; Štifter, S.; Sjöstedt, A.; Šantić, M. Atg5-Deficient Mice Infected with Francisella tularensis LVS Demonstrate Increased Survival and Less Severe Pathology in Internal Organs. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1531. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101531

AMA Style

Kelava I, Mihelčić M, Ožanič M, Marečić V, Knežević M, Ćurlin M, Štifter S, Sjöstedt A, Šantić M. Atg5-Deficient Mice Infected with Francisella tularensis LVS Demonstrate Increased Survival and Less Severe Pathology in Internal Organs. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(10):1531. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101531

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kelava, Ina; Mihelčić, Mirna; Ožanič, Mateja; Marečić, Valentina; Knežević, Maša; Ćurlin, Marija; Štifter, Sanja; Sjöstedt, Anders; Šantić, Marina. 2020. "Atg5-Deficient Mice Infected with Francisella tularensis LVS Demonstrate Increased Survival and Less Severe Pathology in Internal Organs" Microorganisms 8, no. 10: 1531. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101531

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