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Open AccessArticle

Whole Transcriptome Analysis of Aedes albopictus Mosquito Head and Thorax Post-Chikungunya Virus Infection

1
CSIRO Health & Biosecurity, Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong 3220, Australia
2
School of Sciences, RMIT University, Bundoora 3083, Australia
3
CSIRO, Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong 3220, Australia
4
School of Health and Biomedical Science, RMIT University, Bundoora 3083, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current Address: Mosquitoes and Emerging Arboviruses, Institut Pasteur de la Guyane, Cayenne 97306, French Guiana.
Pathogens 2019, 8(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens8030132
Received: 24 July 2019 / Revised: 19 August 2019 / Accepted: 23 August 2019 / Published: 27 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chikungunya Virus Infections)
Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and causes prolonged arthralgia in patients. After crossing the mosquito midgut barrier, the virus disseminates to tissues including the head and salivary glands. To better understand the interaction between Aedes albopictus and CHIKV, we performed RNASeq analysis on pools of mosquito heads and parts of the thorax 8 days post infection, which identified 159 differentially expressed transcripts in infected mosquitos compared to uninfected controls. After validation using RT-qPCR (reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction), inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTKi), which has previously been shown to be anti-inflammatory in mammals after viral infection, was further evaluated for its functional significance. Knockdown of BTKi using double-stranded RNA in a mosquito cell line showed no significant difference in viral RNA or infectivity titer. However, BTKi gene knocked-down cells showed increased apoptosis 24 hours post-infection compared with control cells, suggesting involvement of BTKi in the mosquito response to viral infection. Since BTK in mammals promotes an inflammatory response and has been shown to be involved in osteoclastogenesis, a hallmark of CHIKV pathogenesis, our results suggest a possible conserved mechanism at play between mosquitoes and mammals. Taken together, these results will add to our understanding of Aedes Albopictus interactions with CHIKV. View Full-Text
Keywords: Chikungunya; Aedes albopictus; RNASeq; host–pathogen interactions; Bruton’s tyrosine kinase; BTKi Chikungunya; Aedes albopictus; RNASeq; host–pathogen interactions; Bruton’s tyrosine kinase; BTKi
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Vedururu, R.; Neave, M.J.; Sundaramoorthy, V.; Green, D.; Harper, J.A.; Gorry, P.R.; Duchemin, J.-B.; Paradkar, P.N. Whole Transcriptome Analysis of Aedes albopictus Mosquito Head and Thorax Post-Chikungunya Virus Infection. Pathogens 2019, 8, 132.

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