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Soc. Sci., Volume 3, Issue 4 (December 2014) , Pages 606-961

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Open AccessArticle Regional Frameworks for Safeguarding Children: The Role of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 948-961; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040948
Received: 10 September 2014 / Revised: 5 November 2014 / Accepted: 6 November 2014 / Published: 1 December 2014
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Abstract
This article discusses the safeguarding movement in the context of child protection. After providing it’s key principles and precepts, the relevant provisions of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child which link to safeguarding are stipulated, as well as [...] Read more.
This article discusses the safeguarding movement in the context of child protection. After providing it’s key principles and precepts, the relevant provisions of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child which link to safeguarding are stipulated, as well as a brief description given of the mandate of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child. Some aspects of the practical working methods of the Committee are thereafter considered. With reference to the Committee’s interface with non-governmental organisations, some proposals concerning the Committee and the safeguarding movement are put forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessCommunication I Am Therefore I Do: Group Identification and Effort for the Achievement Goals
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 941-947; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040941
Received: 30 September 2014 / Revised: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 21 November 2014 / Published: 27 November 2014
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Abstract
Relevant others (e.g., fellow group members) influence how goals and goal-directed behaviors are construed and valued. In turn, according to the “expectancy × value” model of motivated behavioral choice, people engage in goal-directed behaviors when they expect success and ascribe high values to [...] Read more.
Relevant others (e.g., fellow group members) influence how goals and goal-directed behaviors are construed and valued. In turn, according to the “expectancy × value” model of motivated behavioral choice, people engage in goal-directed behaviors when they expect success and ascribe high values to a certain task. In this pilot study, we combine predictions from a social psychological goal perspective with recent theoretical developments from educational psychology, testing the processes that link a person’s social identity with the effort for the achievement goals. With a pilot study using a sample of 86 university students, we tested the assumption that expectation for success and subjective task values mediate the relation between the student identity and effort intentions. In line with our expectations, stronger identification with the group of students was related to stronger effort intentions, mediated via interest and attainment value. These results suggest that social identity may have a profound impact on the engagement decisions made in educational settings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Current Debates on Variability in Child Welfare Decision-Making: A Selected Literature Review
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 916-940; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040916
Received: 28 September 2014 / Revised: 11 November 2014 / Accepted: 12 November 2014 / Published: 19 November 2014
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Abstract
This article considers selected drivers of decision variability in child welfare decision-making and explores current debates in relation to these drivers. Covering the related influences of national orientation, risk and responsibility, inequality and poverty, evidence-based practice, constructions of abuse and its causes, domestic [...] Read more.
This article considers selected drivers of decision variability in child welfare decision-making and explores current debates in relation to these drivers. Covering the related influences of national orientation, risk and responsibility, inequality and poverty, evidence-based practice, constructions of abuse and its causes, domestic violence and cognitive processes, it discusses the literature in regards to how each of these influences decision variability. It situates these debates in relation to the ethical issue of variability and the equity issues that variability raises. I propose that despite the ecological complexity that drives decision variability, that improving internal (within-country) decision consistency is still a valid goal. It may be that the use of annotated case examples, kind learning systems, and continued commitments to the social justice issues of inequality and individualisation can contribute to this goal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Practicing from Theory: Thinking and Knowing to “Do” Child Protection Work
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 893-915; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040893
Received: 4 July 2014 / Revised: 18 October 2014 / Accepted: 21 October 2014 / Published: 13 November 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3256 | PDF Full-text (1190 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Child protection practice in much of the Western world is performed using some specific models with limited attention paid to the underpinning of informing worldviews, theories for practice (explanatory theories) and theories of practice (intervention theories). Over the past few years we have [...] Read more.
Child protection practice in much of the Western world is performed using some specific models with limited attention paid to the underpinning of informing worldviews, theories for practice (explanatory theories) and theories of practice (intervention theories). Over the past few years we have explored how child protection practice may be undertaken using a child rights perspective and community development principles and practices. From this we have developed a model which we here seek to support with worldviews, explanatory and intervention theories. We hope this theoretical framework answers some of the complexity found in the “wicked problem” of child abuse and provides guidance to the practice of protecting children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Language in the Wild—Living the Carnival in Social Media
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 871-892; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040871
Received: 3 June 2014 / Revised: 29 September 2014 / Accepted: 30 October 2014 / Published: 12 November 2014
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Abstract
This study presents results from an intervention case study at upper secondary level, in which Blogger was introduced during English class. The overarching interest was to explore the students’ social performances and their interplay with students’ uses of language across multiple forms of [...] Read more.
This study presents results from an intervention case study at upper secondary level, in which Blogger was introduced during English class. The overarching interest was to explore the students’ social performances and their interplay with students’ uses of language across multiple forms of literate activities in blogging. The study draws on a sociocultural perspective, taking a particular interest in language as a meditational tool for communication and interaction in the students’ own digital vernacular practices. Goffman’s dramaturgical approach including the concepts of performance and role distance in front and back regions together with Bakhtin’s notion of carnival were invoked as analytical tools for the analysis of video material as well as ethnographic scraping of online content in the blog. It was found that the students presented a witty, humorous image of themselves, while playing around with language as well as bringing in manipulated media for mockery and self-irony. Analytically speaking the students were living the carnival by utilizing a norm-breaking language—a language in the wild. Though this in-depth study presents a limited number of students’ blogging, the findings contribute to an increased understanding of the in situ creation of a blogger text providing a basis for discussing the uses of language in social media and what this implies for learning languages and for teaching practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Media and Social Learning)
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Open AccessArticle Who Owns Child Abuse?
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 854-870; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040854
Received: 16 July 2014 / Revised: 8 October 2014 / Accepted: 20 October 2014 / Published: 6 November 2014
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3913 | PDF Full-text (207 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Expectations of contemporary child protection apparatuses are strongly influenced by beliefs inherited from the nineteenth century child rescue movement. In particular, the belief that child abuse determination is obvious. However, this assumption fails to make a distinction between nineteenth century’s emphasis on impoverished [...] Read more.
Expectations of contemporary child protection apparatuses are strongly influenced by beliefs inherited from the nineteenth century child rescue movement. In particular, the belief that child abuse determination is obvious. However, this assumption fails to make a distinction between nineteenth century’s emphasis on impoverished environments and the twentieth century introduction of the pathological child abuser. Moreover, the proliferation of kinds of child abuse, and the need to distinguish child abusers from non-abusers, means knowledge is now spread across an array of disciplines and professions, which necessarily destabilizes the definition of child abuse. The increasing exposure of alternate care systems as potentially abusive has similarly destabilized the old common sense solution to neglected children—namely removal. Finally, as uncertainty increases, and definitions become more divergent, the question of what child abuse is, and what should be done about it, becomes increasingly politicized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Yahoo! Answers as a Space for Informal Language Learning
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 841-853; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040841
Received: 4 June 2014 / Revised: 14 August 2014 / Accepted: 9 October 2014 / Published: 24 October 2014
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Abstract
Online social spaces, where users can exchange information, opinions and resources, have achieved wide popularity and are gaining attention in many research fields, including education. Their actual potential support to learning, however, still requires investigation, especially because portals can widely differ as concerns [...] Read more.
Online social spaces, where users can exchange information, opinions and resources, have achieved wide popularity and are gaining attention in many research fields, including education. Their actual potential support to learning, however, still requires investigation, especially because portals can widely differ as concerns purpose and internal structure. This paper aims to contribute in this respect, by concentrating on question answering, a kind of social space not yet widely discussed in education. We analyzed a small corpus of posts from the Languages section of Yahoo! Answers Italy, checking if the questions reveal some inclination to learning or just the desire to obtain a service and if the answers provided by the community members can be considered as reliable sources of knowledge. Our analysis highlights the presence of a variety of question/answer types, from mere information exchange or help for task completion, up to language-related questions prompting valuable short lessons. The quality of answers may widely vary as concerns pertinence, correctness and richness of supporting elements. We found a high number of purely task-oriented questions and answers, but also a higher number of learning-oriented questions and correct, informative answers. This suggests that this kind of social space actually has valuable potential for informal learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Media and Social Learning)
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Open AccessArticle Patterns and Correlates for Bullying among Young Adolescents in Ghana
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 827-840; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040827
Received: 7 July 2014 / Revised: 23 September 2014 / Accepted: 9 October 2014 / Published: 23 October 2014
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Abstract
Bullying is relatively common and is considered to be a public health problem among adolescents worldwide. The present study examined the risk factors associated with bullying behavior among adolescents in a lower-middle-income country setting. Data on 6235 adolescents aged 11–16 years, derived from [...] Read more.
Bullying is relatively common and is considered to be a public health problem among adolescents worldwide. The present study examined the risk factors associated with bullying behavior among adolescents in a lower-middle-income country setting. Data on 6235 adolescents aged 11–16 years, derived from the Republic of Ghana’s contribution to the Global School-based Health Survey, were analyzed using bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analysis. A high prevalence of bullying was found among Ghanaian adolescents. Alcohol-related health compromising behaviors (alcohol use, alcohol misuse and getting into trouble as a result of alcohol) increased the risk of being bullied. In addition, substance use, being physically attacked, being seriously injured, hunger and truancy were also found to increase the risk of being bullied. However, having understanding parents and having classmates who were kind and helpful reduced the likelihood of being bullied. These findings suggest that school-based intervention programs aimed at reducing rates of peer victimization should simultaneously target multiple risk behaviors. Teachers can also reduce peer victimization by introducing programs that enhance adolescents’ acceptance of each other in the classroom. Full article
Open AccessArticle Child Welfare and Successful Reunification through the Socio-Educative Process: Training Needs among Biological Families in Spain
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 809-826; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040809
Received: 22 July 2014 / Revised: 22 September 2014 / Accepted: 25 September 2014 / Published: 22 October 2014
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Abstract
In Spain, an average of 480 children per 100,000 is receiving some type of temporary care, and the reunification process is typically lengthy. Providing the biological family with specific training as part of the reunification process is key to solving this problem. Although [...] Read more.
In Spain, an average of 480 children per 100,000 is receiving some type of temporary care, and the reunification process is typically lengthy. Providing the biological family with specific training as part of the reunification process is key to solving this problem. Although previous research and social policy have emphasized the importance of such training to reunification, the training has not been fully implemented in Spain. This study investigates the specific training needs during the transition phase of the reunification process in which the child prepares to return home. The data were obtained from focus groups and through semi-structured interviews with 135 participants: 63 professionals from the Child Protection System and 42 parents and 30 children who have undergone or are currently undergoing reunification. A qualitative methodology and Atlas.ti software were used to analyze the interview content. The results indicate three specific training needs: (a) understanding the reasons for reunification and the reunification phases; (b) empowerment strategies; and (c) social support. These findings suggest the best practices for formulating specific support programs for this population during the reunification transition period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Child Protection and Vulnerable Families: Trends and Issues in the Australian Context
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 785-808; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040785
Received: 11 August 2014 / Revised: 25 September 2014 / Accepted: 26 September 2014 / Published: 21 October 2014
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Abstract
This paper will provide an overview and analysis of developments in child protection and out of home care in Australia. It will outline early responses to perceived inadequate parenting to provide the historical and policy contexts of contemporary debates on, and responses to, [...] Read more.
This paper will provide an overview and analysis of developments in child protection and out of home care in Australia. It will outline early responses to perceived inadequate parenting to provide the historical and policy contexts of contemporary debates on, and responses to, the care and protection of children and young people. Child maltreatment affects a large number of children across Australia. The statistics of reported maltreatment reflect striking increases over time. Over the last decade, several public inquiries into the operation of child protection have been undertaken in a number of state jurisdictions following which some states have embarked on large scale reform of legislation and policy, to either strengthen the child protection mandate, or refocus services. Some exemplars of significant reform in selected states will be cited. Some of the themes that will be explored in the paper will include the impact of major state based public inquiries, overseas reviews and research on child protection policy and practice; the changing balance between orientations to child protection and family support, the parameters of out of home care, the high levels of governmental intervention experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, and a critical appraisal of major transformations in protective care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Addressing the Clinical Burden of Child Physical Abuse and Neglect in a Large Metropolitan Region: Improving the Evidence-Base
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 771-784; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040771
Received: 23 July 2014 / Revised: 8 October 2014 / Accepted: 8 October 2014 / Published: 20 October 2014
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Abstract
Children at risk of abuse are more likely to be hospitalized and utilize health services according to international research. In a large metropolitan health region in New South Wales, Australia, there was little known of the clinical burden of child physical abuse and/or [...] Read more.
Children at risk of abuse are more likely to be hospitalized and utilize health services according to international research. In a large metropolitan health region in New South Wales, Australia, there was little known of the clinical burden of child physical abuse and/or neglect (PAN), or of systems for clinical assessment of children presenting with abuse/neglect. We aimed to identify the number of children presenting with suspected PAN to emergency departments (EDs) and paediatric services in this region, to determine enablers and barriers to assessment for children with PAN presenting to frontline services, and to identify best practices to address gaps. We collated available data on children presenting to EDs and paediatric services with suspected PAN in 2007. We interviewed 36 health professionals from nine hospitals and 12 statutory child protection professionals, across the region before undertaking relevant document analysis. Of 64,700 paediatric ED presentations, a quarter were due to injury; 2%–5% of these were due to maltreatment. Clinician estimates and assessments of PAN varied widely; health and welfare workers identified major practice gaps, as well as good local practice. We identified feasible minimum standards for improving clinical assessment and follow-up for children presenting with PAN, given the right organizational support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Dealing with Risk in Child and Family Social Work: From an Anxious to a Reflexive Professional?
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 758-770; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040758
Received: 26 August 2014 / Revised: 26 September 2014 / Accepted: 9 October 2014 / Published: 16 October 2014
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Abstract
The rhetoric of risk has become a prominent issue in the field of child and family social work. As a consequence, an emerging politics of fear has re-oriented this field towards managing, controlling, and securing social work practice against risk, rather than responding [...] Read more.
The rhetoric of risk has become a prominent issue in the field of child and family social work. As a consequence, an emerging politics of fear has re-oriented this field towards managing, controlling, and securing social work practice against risk, rather than responding meaningfully to the needs and concerns of children and families. In the available body of research, it is argued that this general tendency creates “anxious” professionals. As a response, different scholars refer to the need to “speak back to fear”. In this article, we analyze this claim in the context of a currently ongoing large-scale policy reform, named Integrated Youth Care (IYC), in the field of child welfare and protection in Flanders (the Dutch speaking part of Belgium). The debate on dealing with risk is often limited to an organizational and methodological discussion. We assert that we should reorient this debate and make a plea for a radical approach of applying a welfare perspective in child welfare and protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle A Critical Examination of Child Protection Initiatives in Sport Contexts
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 742-757; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040742
Received: 3 July 2014 / Revised: 21 August 2014 / Accepted: 28 August 2014 / Published: 14 October 2014
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Abstract
With the broadening of focus on child maltreatment beyond intra-familial settings, there is growing awareness of occurrences of maltreatment within the sport context. Millions of children participate in organized sport annually, and despite a tendency to view sport as a context by which [...] Read more.
With the broadening of focus on child maltreatment beyond intra-familial settings, there is growing awareness of occurrences of maltreatment within the sport context. Millions of children participate in organized sport annually, and despite a tendency to view sport as a context by which to enhance the overall health and development of children, it is also a context in which children are vulnerable to experiences of maltreatment. The well-documented power ascribed to coaches, the unregulated nature of sport and a “win-at-all-costs” approach contribute to a setting that many propose is conducive to maltreatment. A number of high profile cases of sexual abuse of athletes across several countries in the 1990s prompted sport organizations to respond with the development of child protection measures. This study examined seven child protection in sport initiatives in terms of the extent to which they originated from research, had content that was consistent with scholarly work and were evaluated empirically. The findings indicated that these initiatives were not empirically derived nor evaluated. Recommendations are made to more closely align research with these initiatives in order to protect children and to promote a safe and growth-enhancing experience for young participants in sport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Child Protection Victims and the “Evil Institutions”
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 726-741; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040726
Received: 23 June 2014 / Revised: 27 August 2014 / Accepted: 17 September 2014 / Published: 10 October 2014
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Abstract
The Dutch child protection system has been the target of harsh criticism in recent decades. The legitimacy of child protection services seems to have eroded. In this article, we analyze this changing legitimacy of child protection against the background of declining parental authority [...] Read more.
The Dutch child protection system has been the target of harsh criticism in recent decades. The legitimacy of child protection services seems to have eroded. In this article, we analyze this changing legitimacy of child protection against the background of declining parental authority and in relation to the disappearance of positive pedagogical ideologies and the mainly bureaucratic response of child protection agencies. Two recent inquiries in the Netherlands on child sexual abuse within child protection-related services have emphasized the position of children as vulnerable victims of negative pedagogical practices, mirroring a general trend of “victimization”. It is concluded that reinforcement of the professional role of child protection workers may be a start towards building new trust in child protection and establishing a newfound legitimacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Protecting Children and Adolescents in Uruguay: Civil Society’s Role in Policy Reform
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 705-725; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040705
Received: 17 June 2014 / Revised: 9 September 2014 / Accepted: 9 September 2014 / Published: 9 October 2014
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Abstract
This article analyzes the advocacy efforts of civil societal actors in Uruguay who have sought to promote the rights of children. I discuss the strategies that members of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) used to achieve a greater presence in debates leading to significant policy [...] Read more.
This article analyzes the advocacy efforts of civil societal actors in Uruguay who have sought to promote the rights of children. I discuss the strategies that members of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) used to achieve a greater presence in debates leading to significant policy changes in the area of child protection. Child advocates achieved relatively high levels of political mobilization and influence throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. The analysis focuses on their multi-year campaign to reform the Children’s Code of 1934, which culminated in the adoption of a new Code of Childhood and Adolescence in 2004. I argue that two variables help explain their participation in policy making: effective issue framing and successful alliance building. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle The Child Protection System from the Perspective of Young People: Messages from 3 Studies
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 687-704; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040687
Received: 16 June 2014 / Revised: 7 September 2014 / Accepted: 10 September 2014 / Published: 7 October 2014
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Abstract
This article reports findings and reflections based on the results of three different research projects conducted between 2008 and 2013 and focusing on the perspective of young care leavers in Spain. The overall aim was to examine these young people’s perceptions and evaluations [...] Read more.
This article reports findings and reflections based on the results of three different research projects conducted between 2008 and 2013 and focusing on the perspective of young care leavers in Spain. The overall aim was to examine these young people’s perceptions and evaluations of how they were treated while in the public care system, mainly residential care. Reviewing these qualitative studies, the most common and relevant issues highlighted by young people were related to the following themes: (a) entering care; (b) stability and emotional bonds in care; (c) education; (d) friends; (e) labelling, stigmatization, rights and opportunities; (f) autonomy and responsibility versus overprotection; (g) contact with parents, siblings and extended family; (h) maltreatment in care; and (i) leaving care. One of the main elements used in their assessments was comparison (i) between their previous situation within their birth family and the quality of care experienced in the residential home; and (ii) between what these young people commonly refer to as “normal children” and children in care. Recommendations deriving from their advice and opinions are also debated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle The Productive Uses of Conflict in Child Protection
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 672-686; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040672
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 12 September 2014 / Accepted: 17 September 2014 / Published: 2 October 2014
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2024 | PDF Full-text (69 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Some child protection cases exemplify a certain kind of cooperative interdependence, a consequence of the ways in which practitioners and clients are entangled. Client and practitioner are “stuck” with each other and need each other to succeed. There is also an intrinsic power [...] Read more.
Some child protection cases exemplify a certain kind of cooperative interdependence, a consequence of the ways in which practitioners and clients are entangled. Client and practitioner are “stuck” with each other and need each other to succeed. There is also an intrinsic power imbalance that technique, ideology, and skill cannot hide and that has risks for the well-being and success of the practitioner-client relationship. There is also a risk to the practitioner of biases caused by successful influence. “Productive conflict,” defined as conflict under conditions of cooperative interdependence, may compensate for these challenges and lead to “integrative solutions.” In these cases the conflict itself is a kind of collaboration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessArticle Concerted Practice-Based Actions in Intimate Partner and Family Violence: When the Children’s Well-Being Is the Central Concern
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 650-671; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040650
Received: 22 July 2014 / Revised: 3 September 2014 / Accepted: 16 September 2014 / Published: 30 September 2014
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Abstract
In Canada, the exposure of children to intimate partner violence is, along with negligence, one of the most frequent forms of maltreatment. Intimate partner violence raises important issues with regard to child custody and to the exercising of parental roles. The aid provided [...] Read more.
In Canada, the exposure of children to intimate partner violence is, along with negligence, one of the most frequent forms of maltreatment. Intimate partner violence raises important issues with regard to child custody and to the exercising of parental roles. The aid provided for children exposed to intimate partner violence covers a range of programs, in particular community services specializing in intimate partner violence, frontline social and health services, and child protection. However, these resource services do not share the same missions, or the same understanding of the problems and possible solutions, since they often operate in parallel networks. The complex situations of families confronted with intimate partner violence present considerable challenges in terms of collaboration between the different organizations. Action research was employed to develop an innovative concertation strategy that fostered collaboration between practitioners from different family resource services. The strategy, which was implemented in the Québec City region between 2011 and 2013, was then evaluated. This article presents the results of this evaluation as well as the positive outcomes that the concertation strategy had for the practitioners’ practice and for the improvement of family services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Open AccessCommunication Social Inclusion in Swedish Public Service Television: The Representation of Gender, Ethnicity and People with Disabilities as Program Leaders for Children’s Programs
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 645-649; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040645
Received: 21 May 2014 / Revised: 11 September 2014 / Accepted: 15 September 2014 / Published: 26 September 2014
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Abstract
We studied the inclusion of traditionally underrepresented groups in society, females, persons of non-European ethnic background and people with apparent disabilities. Specifically we addressed their participation as program leaders in children’s programs in the Swedish Public Service Television to see if they corresponded [...] Read more.
We studied the inclusion of traditionally underrepresented groups in society, females, persons of non-European ethnic background and people with apparent disabilities. Specifically we addressed their participation as program leaders in children’s programs in the Swedish Public Service Television to see if they corresponded to their relative share of the population. Using the official web site of the Swedish Public Service Television, listing all their programs, we found that of 65 program leaders in 41 television programs, 42% were female, 12% of the program leaders were of non-European ethnic background and 20% had apparent disabilities. There was a non-significant trend for women to be underrepresented as program leaders, people of ethnic non-European background had significantly higher representation than their share of the population, and people with apparent disabilities had significantly much higher percentage than their share of the Swedish population as program leaders for children programs. This case study indicates that traditionally underrepresented groups such as people of non-ethnic European background and people with disabilities do well in the competition for positions as program leaders for television programs that target children. This can be seen as an encouraging step from the present norm in Swedish society of mainly hiring people that you know. Full article
Open AccessArticle Needs Assessment of an Ethnic Chinese Community in Japan
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 628-644; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040628
Received: 17 May 2014 / Revised: 14 August 2014 / Accepted: 10 September 2014 / Published: 26 September 2014
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Abstract
This study is a needs assessment of ethnic Chinese older adults in Japan. The Delphi method was applied to identify the needs addressed by the focus groups. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs model guided the examination of the community’s political, economic and social environment [...] Read more.
This study is a needs assessment of ethnic Chinese older adults in Japan. The Delphi method was applied to identify the needs addressed by the focus groups. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs model guided the examination of the community’s political, economic and social environment in satisfying the needs of older community members. The needs were matched with a city’s Health, Welfare, and Long-term Care Insurance Program Plan seeking to identify differences between ethnic Chinese and Japanese community members. Most of the needs were similar to those of the Japanese citizens, but there were a few issues related to financial and cultural needs that were unique to the ethnic Chinese group. Full article
Open AccessArticle “I Know People Think I’m a Complete Pain in the Neck”: An Examination of the Introduction of Child Protection and “Safeguarding” in English Sport from the Perspective of National Governing Body Safeguarding Lead Officers
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(4), 606-627; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci3040606
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 16 August 2014 / Accepted: 2 September 2014 / Published: 26 September 2014
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Abstract
Child protection in sport emerged at the start of the 21st century amidst headlines about coaches raping, sexually assaulting and abusing children. Against this backdrop, in 2001 the UK government established an independent agency, the English Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), which [...] Read more.
Child protection in sport emerged at the start of the 21st century amidst headlines about coaches raping, sexually assaulting and abusing children. Against this backdrop, in 2001 the UK government established an independent agency, the English Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), which introduced national child protection standards for sports organizations. This included the requirement to appoint national “safeguarding lead officers”. Utilizing the theoretical framework of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this paper considers the impact of “safeguarding and child protection” (SCP) within the English sports community through the experiences of those who have been at the vanguard of its implementation in the early years of its establishment within sport. Utilizing data from qualitative interviews with nine national safeguarding lead officers (SLOs), the paper discusses the challenges experienced by SLOs and critically appraises the relation between them (their habitus) and the prevailing logic (capital) within their sporting fields. We discuss the extent to which SLOs have been supported by their organizations and conclude with a consideration of the degree to which national governing bodies of sport (NGBs) have been invested in SCP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Developments in Child Protection) Printed Edition available
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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