Next Article in Journal
Emission Reduction Potential of Different Types of Finnish Buildings through Energy Retrofits
Next Article in Special Issue
Suitability of Seismic Isolation for Buildings Founded on Soft Soil. Case Study of a RC Building in Shanghai
Previous Article in Journal
An Anchoring Groove Technique to Enhance the Bond Behavior between Heat-Damaged Concrete and CFRP Composites
Previous Article in Special Issue
Implementation of Passive Radiative Cooling Technology in Buildings: A Review
Open AccessArticle

Increasing Green Infrastructure in Cities: Impact on Ambient Temperature, Air Quality and Heat-Related Mortality and Morbidity

1
Anita Lawrence Chair High Performance Architecture, School Built Environment, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
2
School Built Environment, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Buildings 2020, 10(12), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120233
Received: 9 November 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 2 December 2020 / Published: 7 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Buildings: 10th Anniversary)
Urban vegetation provides undeniable benefits to urban climate, health, thermal comfort and environmental quality of cities and represents one of the most considered urban heat mitigation measures. Despite the plethora of available scientific information, very little is known about the holistic and global impact of a potential increase of urban green infrastructure (GI) on urban climate, environmental quality and health, and their synergies and trade-offs. There is a need to evaluate globally the extent to which additional GI provides benefits and quantify the problems arising from the deployment of additional greenery in cities which are usually overlooked or neglected. The present paper has reviewed and analysed 55 fully evaluated scenarios and case studies investigating the impact of additional GI on urban temperature, air pollution and health for 39 cities. Statistically significant correlations between the percentage increase of the urban GI and the peak daily and night ambient temperatures are obtained. The average maximum peak daily and night-time temperature drop may not exceed 1.8 and 2.3 °C respectively, even for a maximum GI fraction. In parallel, a statistically significant correlation between the peak daily temperature decrease caused by higher GI fractions and heat-related mortality is found. When the peak daily temperature drops by 0.1 °C, then the percentage of heat-related mortality decreases on average by 3.0% The impact of additional urban GI on the concentration of urban pollutants is analysed, and the main parameters contributing to decrease or increase of the pollutants’ concentration are presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: green infrastructure; urban trees; heat mitigation; heat-related mortality green infrastructure; urban trees; heat mitigation; heat-related mortality
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Santamouris, M.; Osmond, P. Increasing Green Infrastructure in Cities: Impact on Ambient Temperature, Air Quality and Heat-Related Mortality and Morbidity. Buildings 2020, 10, 233. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120233

AMA Style

Santamouris M, Osmond P. Increasing Green Infrastructure in Cities: Impact on Ambient Temperature, Air Quality and Heat-Related Mortality and Morbidity. Buildings. 2020; 10(12):233. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120233

Chicago/Turabian Style

Santamouris, Matthaios; Osmond, Paul. 2020. "Increasing Green Infrastructure in Cities: Impact on Ambient Temperature, Air Quality and Heat-Related Mortality and Morbidity" Buildings 10, no. 12: 233. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120233

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop