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Implementation of Passive Radiative Cooling Technology in Buildings: A Review

Department of Architecture and Built Environment, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
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Buildings 2020, 10(12), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120215
Received: 29 October 2020 / Revised: 19 November 2020 / Accepted: 21 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Buildings: 10th Anniversary)
Radiative cooling (RC) is attracting more interest from building engineers and architects. Using the sky as the heat sink, a radiative cooling material can be passively cooled by emitting heat to the sky. As a result of the development of material technology, RC research has been revived, with the aim of increasing the materials’ cooling power as well as finding reliable ways to utilize it in cooling for buildings. This review identifies some issues in the current implementation of RC technologies in buildings from an architectural point of view. Besides the technical performance of the RC technologies, some architectural aspects, such as integration with architectural features, aesthetic requirements, as well as fully passive implementations of RC, also need to be considered for building application. In addition, performance evaluation of a building-integrated RC system should begin to account for its benefit to the occupant’s health and comfort alongside the technical performance. In conclusion, this review on RC implementation in buildings provides a meaningful discussion in regard to the direction of the research. View Full-Text
Keywords: radiative cooling; architectural application; combination; passive design architecture radiative cooling; architectural application; combination; passive design architecture
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MDPI and ACS Style

Suhendri; Hu, M.; Su, Y.; Darkwa, J.; Riffat, S. Implementation of Passive Radiative Cooling Technology in Buildings: A Review. Buildings 2020, 10, 215. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120215

AMA Style

Suhendri, Hu M, Su Y, Darkwa J, Riffat S. Implementation of Passive Radiative Cooling Technology in Buildings: A Review. Buildings. 2020; 10(12):215. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120215

Chicago/Turabian Style

Suhendri; Hu, Mingke; Su, Yuehong; Darkwa, Jo; Riffat, Saffa. 2020. "Implementation of Passive Radiative Cooling Technology in Buildings: A Review" Buildings 10, no. 12: 215. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120215

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