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Open AccessArticle

A Feasibility Study of an Extrusion-Based Fabrication Process for Personalized Drugs

School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
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J. Pers. Med. 2020, 10(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm10010016 (registering DOI)
Received: 9 January 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 4 March 2020
Developing a high-efficiency manufacturing system for personalized medicine plays an important role in increasing the feasibility of personalized medication. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a new extrusion-based fabrication process for personalized drugs with a faster production rate. This process uses two syringe pumps with a coaxial needle as an extruder, which extrudes two materials with varying ratios into a capsule. The mixture of hydrogel, polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, poly acrylic acid and the simulated active pharmaceutical ingredient, Aspirin, was used. To validate the method, samples with different ratios of immediate release (IR) and sustained release (SR) mixtures were fabricated. The results of a dissolution test show that it is feasible to control the release profile by changing the IR and SR ratio using this fabrication setup. The fabrication time for each capsule is about 20 seconds, which is significantly faster than the current 3D printing methods. In conclusion, the proposed fabrication method shows a clear potential to step toward the feasibility of personalized medication. View Full-Text
Keywords: personalized medicine; manufacturing; drug delivery; controlled release; 3D printing personalized medicine; manufacturing; drug delivery; controlled release; 3D printing
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Yu, I.; Chen, R.K. A Feasibility Study of an Extrusion-Based Fabrication Process for Personalized Drugs. J. Pers. Med. 2020, 10, 16.

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