Next Article in Journal
Value of Diffusion Weighted MRI with Quantitative ADC Map in Diagnosis of Malignant Thyroid Disease
Next Article in Special Issue
BRCA1/2 Molecular Assay for Ovarian Cancer Patients: A Survey through Italian Departments of Oncology and Molecular and Genomic Diagnostic Laboratories
Previous Article in Journal
The Molecular Effects of Ionizing Radiations on Brain Cells: Radiation Necrosis vs. Tumor Recurrence
Previous Article in Special Issue
Characteristics of in Vivo Model Systems for Ovarian Cancer Studies
Open AccessArticle

Psychological Response to a False Positive Ovarian Cancer Screening Test Result: Distinct Distress Trajectories and Their Associated Characteristics

1
Nursing Instruction, University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
3
Department of Behavioral Science, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diagnostics 2019, 9(4), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics9040128
Received: 20 August 2019 / Revised: 20 September 2019 / Accepted: 23 September 2019 / Published: 25 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Cancer: Characteristics, Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment)
Routine screening for ovarian cancer (OC) can yield an abnormal result later deemed benign. Such false positive (FP) results have been shown to trigger distress, which generally resolves over time. However, women might differ in the trajectory of the distress experience. Women participating in a routine OC screening program (n = 373) who received an abnormal screening result completed a baseline assessment prior to a follow-up screening test to clarify the nature of their abnormal result. All women were subsequently informed that no malignancy was present, and follow-up assessments were completed one and four months post-baseline. Demographic, clinical, dispositional (optimism, monitoring), and social environmental (social constraint, social support) variables were assessed at baseline. OC-specific distress was assessed at all three assessments. Trajectory analyses identified three distress trajectories differing in the baseline level of distress. A high decreasing trajectory, representing about 25% of women, was characterized by high levels of distress at baseline with distress declining over time, but still elevated at four-month follow-up. In contrast, a no distress trajectory group, representing about 30% of women, was characterized by essentially no distress at any time point. Principal risk factors for membership in the high decreasing trajectory group included a family history of OC, lower dispositional optimism, and greater social constraint. These risk factors could be used to target resources efficiently towards managing women at risk for potentially clinically-significant distress after receipt of an FP OC screening test. View Full-Text
Keywords: screening; ovarian cancer; distress; adjustment; trajectory analysis screening; ovarian cancer; distress; adjustment; trajectory analysis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wiggins, A.T.; Pavlik, E.J.; Andrykowski, M.A. Psychological Response to a False Positive Ovarian Cancer Screening Test Result: Distinct Distress Trajectories and Their Associated Characteristics. Diagnostics 2019, 9, 128.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop