Next Article in Journal
Modeling the Crystallization and Emplacement Conditions of a Basaltic Trachyandesitic Sill at Mt. Etna Volcano
Next Article in Special Issue
Mineralogical Features of Ore Diagenites in the Urals Massive Sulfide Deposits, Russia
Previous Article in Journal
Selective Separation of Hematite by a Synthesized Depressant in Various Scales of Anionic Reverse Flotation
Previous Article in Special Issue
Basin Evolution and Massive Sulfide Deposition at Rammelsberg (Germany): Updating the Subsidence Analysis
Open AccessArticle

Chlorite-White Mica Pairs’ Composition as a Micro-Chemical Guide to Fingerprint Massive Sulfide Deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada

1
Department of Earth Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3, Canada
2
Department of Geology, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
3
Geological Surveys Branch, Department of Energy and Resource Development, South Tetagouche, NB E2A 7B8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9020125
Received: 23 September 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 15 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Massive Sulfide Deposits all around the World)
The compositions of phyllosilicates, with a focus on fluid-mobile elements, were evaluated as a means to fingerprint the Middle Ordovician metamorphosed (greenschist facies) volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp (BMC), Canada. Ninety-five drill-core samples from six of the major deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp (Brunswick No. 12, Heath Steele B zone, Halfmile Lake Deep zone, Key Anacon East zone, Louvicourt, and Restigouche) were analyzed using electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Typically, phyllosilicates (chlorite, white mica, and to a lesser extent biotite) are ubiquitous phases in the host rocks of the massive sulfide deposits of the BMC. Electron microprobe analysis results show a wide compositional variation in chlorite and white mica. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis was performed to measure fluid-mobile elements, showing that Tl is distinctly enriched in all white mica (up to 719 ppm) relative to chlorite (up to 50.1 ppm). Chlorite hosts Sn (up to 4600 ppm), Hg (up to 7.3 ppm), Sb (up to 35.4 ppm), As (up to 1320 ppm), In (up to 307 ppm), Cd (up to 83.2 ppm), and Se (up to 606 ppm). White mica hosts Sn (up to 1316 ppm), Hg (up to 93 ppm), Sb (up to 1630 ppm), As (up to 14,800 ppm), In (up to 1186 ppm), Cd (up to 98 ppm), and Se (up to 38.8 ppm). Limited LA-ICP-MS analysis on biotite indicates a higher overall concentration of Tl (mean = 14.6 ppm) relative to co-existing white mica (mean = 2.18 ppm). On average, biotite is also more enriched in Hg, Sn, and Ba relative to chlorite and white mica. Laser Ablation ICP-MS profiles of chlorite, white mica, and biotite demonstrate smooth time-dependent variations diagnostic of structural substitution of these elements. Compositional variation of chlorite-white mica pairs presented in the current study shows systematic variations as a function of distance from the mineralized horizons. This highlights the potential to use trace-element signatures in these phyllosilicate pairs to identify proximal (chlorite) and distal (white mica) footprints for volcanogenic massive sulfides exploration. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bathurst Mining Camp (BMC); biotite; chlorite; fingerprint; fluid-mobile elements; LA-ICP-MS; massive sulfide deposit (VMS); phyllosilicate; vectoring tool; white mica Bathurst Mining Camp (BMC); biotite; chlorite; fingerprint; fluid-mobile elements; LA-ICP-MS; massive sulfide deposit (VMS); phyllosilicate; vectoring tool; white mica
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Soltani Dehnavi, A.; McFarlane, C.R.M.; Lentz, D.R.; McClenaghan, S.H.; Walker, J.A. Chlorite-White Mica Pairs’ Composition as a Micro-Chemical Guide to Fingerprint Massive Sulfide Deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada. Minerals 2019, 9, 125.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop