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Atmosphere 2018, 9(11), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9110434

Non-Monotonic Dependencies of Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation on Aerosol Loading in Deep Convective Clouds: A Case Study Using the WRF Model with Bin Microphysics

1
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York, NY 10025, USA
3
Department of Applied Mathematics, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar 14201, Mongolia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aerosol-Cloud Interactions)
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Abstract

Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in deep convective clouds are investigated through numerical simulations of a heavy precipitation event over South Korea on 15–16 July 2017. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with a bin microphysics scheme is used, and various aerosol number concentrations in the range N0 = 50–12,800 cm−3 are considered. Precipitation amount changes non-monotonically with increasing aerosol loading, with a maximum near a moderate aerosol loading (N0 = 800 cm−3). Up to this optimal value, an increase in aerosol number concentration results in a greater quantity of small droplets formed by nucleation, increasing the number of ice crystals. Ice crystals grow into snow particles through deposition and riming, leading to enhanced melting and precipitation. Beyond the optimal value, a greater aerosol loading enhances generation of ice crystals while the overall growth of ice hydrometeors through deposition stagnates. Subsequently, the riming rate decreases because of the smaller size of snow particles and supercooled drops, leading to a decrease in ice melting and a slight suppression of precipitation. As aerosol loading increases, cold pool and low-level convergence strengthen monotonically, but cloud development is more strongly affected by latent heating and convection within the system that is non-monotonically reinforced. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions; deep convective clouds; heavy precipitation; bin cloud microphysics; WRF model aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions; deep convective clouds; heavy precipitation; bin cloud microphysics; WRF model
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Jeon, Y.-L.; Moon, S.; Lee, H.; Baik, J.-J.; Lkhamjav, J. Non-Monotonic Dependencies of Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation on Aerosol Loading in Deep Convective Clouds: A Case Study Using the WRF Model with Bin Microphysics. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 434.

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