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Open AccessArticle

The Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Skin–Mucus Proteome and Its Nutrient Potential for the Resident Bacterial Community

1
Faculty of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), NO-1432 Ås, Norway
2
Faculty of Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), NO-1432 Ås, Norway
3
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2019, 10(7), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes10070515
Received: 29 April 2019 / Revised: 1 July 2019 / Accepted: 4 July 2019 / Published: 7 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Host-Bacterial Associations in Marine Organisms)
Norway is the largest producer and exporter of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) worldwide. Skin disorders correlated with bacterial infections represent an important challenge for fish farmers due to the economic losses caused. Little is known about this topic, thus studying the skin–mucus of Salmo salar and its bacterial community depict a step forward in understanding fish welfare in aquaculture. In this study, we used label free quantitative mass spectrometry to investigate the skin–mucus proteins associated with both Atlantic salmon and bacteria. In particular, the microbial temporal proteome dynamics during nine days of mucus incubation with sterilized seawater was investigated, in order to evaluate their capacity to utilize mucus components for growth in this environment. At the start of the incubation period, the largest proportion of proteins (~99%) belonged to the salmon and many of these proteins were assigned to protecting functions, confirming the defensive role of mucus. On the contrary, after nine days of incubation, most of the proteins detected were assigned to bacteria, mainly to the genera Vibrio and Pseudoalteromonas. Most of the predicted secreted proteins were affiliated with transport and metabolic processes. In particular, a large abundance and variety of bacterial proteases were observed, highlighting the capacity of bacteria to degrade the skin–mucus proteins of Atlantic salmon. View Full-Text
Keywords: teleost; Salmo salar; skin–mucus; microbiome; proteome; aquaculture teleost; Salmo salar; skin–mucus; microbiome; proteome; aquaculture
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Minniti, G.; Rød Sandve, S.; Padra, J.T.; Heldal Hagen, L.; Lindén, S.; Pope, P.B.; Ø. Arntzen, M.; Vaaje-Kolstad, G. The Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Skin–Mucus Proteome and Its Nutrient Potential for the Resident Bacterial Community. Genes 2019, 10, 515.

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