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Open AccessArticle

miR-26a is Involved in Glycometabolism and Affects Boar Sperm Viability by Targeting PDHX

1
College of Animal Sciences and Technology, and Farm Animal Genetic Resources Exploration and Innovation Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China
2
Department of Theriogenology, Riphah College of Veterinary Sciences, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
3
Department of Veterinary Anatomy & Histology, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Sakrand 67210, Pakistan
4
College of Veterinary Medicine, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China
5
Department of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Sakrand 67210, Pakistan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cells 2020, 9(1), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9010146
Received: 3 December 2019 / Revised: 26 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 8 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Regulatory Functions of microRNAs)
miR-26a is associated with sperm metabolism and can affect sperm motility and apoptosis. However, how miR-26a affects sperm motility remains largely unknown. Our previous study indicated that the PDHX gene is predicted to be a potential target of miR-26a, which is responsible for pyruvate oxidative decarboxylation which is considered as a key step for connecting glycolysis with oxidative phosphorylation. In this study, we first reported a potential relationship between miR-26a and PDHX and their expressions in fresh, frozen-thawed, and epididymal boar sperm. Then, sperm viability and survival were determined after transfection of miR-26a. mRNA and protein expression level of PDHX in the liquid-preserved boar sperm after transfection were also determined by RT-qPCR and Western Blot (WB). Our results showed that expression level of PDHX was significantly increased during sperm transit from epididymal caput to corpus and cauda. Similarly, expression of PDHX was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in fresh sperm as compared to epididymal cauda and frozen-thawed sperm. However, the expression of miR-26a in epididymal corpus sperm was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of caput and cauda sperm. Furthermore, after transfection of boar sperm with miR-26a mimic and inhibitor under liquid storage, the lowest and highest sperm viability was observed in miR-26a mimic and inhibitor treatment (P < 0.05), respectively. The protein levels of PDHX, after 24 and 48 h of transfection of miR-26a mimics and inhibitor, were notably decreased and increased (P < 0.05), respectively, as compared to negative control (NC) group. In conclusion, the novel and enticing findings of our study provide a reasonable evidence that miR-26a via PDHX, a link between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, could regulate the glycometabolic pathway which eventually affect boar sperm viability and survival. View Full-Text
Keywords: boar sperm; glycometabolism; miR-26a; PDHX; sperm viability boar sperm; glycometabolism; miR-26a; PDHX; sperm viability
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Wang, W.; Liang, K.; Chang, Y.; Ran, M.; Zhang, Y.; Ali, M.A.; Dai, D.; Qazi, I.H.; Zhang, M.; Zhou, G.; Yang, J.; Angel, C.; Zeng, C. miR-26a is Involved in Glycometabolism and Affects Boar Sperm Viability by Targeting PDHX. Cells 2020, 9, 146.

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