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Review

An Update on the Impact of Climate Change in Viticulture and Potential Adaptations

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EGFV, Bordeaux Sciences Agro, INRA, Univ. Bordeaux, ISVV, 210 Chemin de Leysotte, F-33882 Villenave d’Ornon, France
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Laboratoires Dubernet, ZA du Castellas, 35 Rue de la Combe du Meunier, F-11100 Montredon des Corbières, France
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UMR 1131 Santé de la Vigne et Qualité du Vin, INRA, Université de Strasbourg, F-68000 Colmar, France
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Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, P.O. Box 85084, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, Christchurch, New Zealand
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2019, 9(9), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090514
Received: 1 August 2019 / Revised: 1 September 2019 / Accepted: 3 September 2019 / Published: 5 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viticulture and Winemaking under Climate Change)
Climate change will impose increasingly warm and dry conditions on vineyards. Wine quality and yield are strongly influenced by climatic conditions and depend on complex interactions between temperatures, water availability, plant material, and viticultural techniques. In established winegrowing regions, growers have optimized yield and quality by choosing plant material and viticultural techniques according to local climatic conditions, but as the climate changes, these will need to be adjusted. Adaptations to higher temperatures include changing plant material (e.g., rootstocks, cultivars and clones) and modifying viticultural techniques (e.g., changing trunk height, leaf area to fruit weight ratio, timing of pruning) such that harvest dates are maintained in the optimal period at the end of September or early October in the Northern Hemisphere. Vineyards can be made more resilient to drought by planting drought resistant plant material, modifying training systems (e.g., goblet bush vines, or trellised vineyards at wider row spacing), or selecting soils with greater soil water holding capacity. While most vineyards in Europe are currently dry-farmed, irrigation may also be an option to grow sustainable yields under increasingly dry conditions but consideration must be given to associated impacts on water resources and the environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; viticulture; adaptation; temperature; drought; plant material; rootstock; training system; phenology; modeling climate change; viticulture; adaptation; temperature; drought; plant material; rootstock; training system; phenology; modeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

van Leeuwen, C.; Destrac-Irvine, A.; Dubernet, M.; Duchêne, E.; Gowdy, M.; Marguerit, E.; Pieri, P.; Parker, A.; de Rességuier, L.; Ollat, N. An Update on the Impact of Climate Change in Viticulture and Potential Adaptations. Agronomy 2019, 9, 514. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090514

AMA Style

van Leeuwen C, Destrac-Irvine A, Dubernet M, Duchêne E, Gowdy M, Marguerit E, Pieri P, Parker A, de Rességuier L, Ollat N. An Update on the Impact of Climate Change in Viticulture and Potential Adaptations. Agronomy. 2019; 9(9):514. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090514

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Leeuwen, Cornelis, Agnès Destrac-Irvine, Matthieu Dubernet, Eric Duchêne, Mark Gowdy, Elisa Marguerit, Philippe Pieri, Amber Parker, Laure de Rességuier, and Nathalie Ollat. 2019. "An Update on the Impact of Climate Change in Viticulture and Potential Adaptations" Agronomy 9, no. 9: 514. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9090514

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