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Article

Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Thirteen Nigerian Cassava Landraces to Elucidate Starch and Carotenoid Composition

1
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sundsvägen 10, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden
2
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, PMB 5320, Oyo Road, Ibadan 200001, Oyo State, Nigeria
3
Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Plant Quality and Food Security, Theodor-Echtermeyer-Weg 1, 14979 Großbeeren, Germany
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Department of Food Chemistry, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany
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Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, CNR, via Amendola 122, I-70126 Bari, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030424
Received: 5 February 2020 / Revised: 5 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 20 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofortification of Crops)
The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa necessitates effective approaches to improve provitamin A content of major staple crops. Cassava holds much promise for food security in sub-Saharan Africa, but a negative correlation between β-carotene, a provitamin A carotenoid, and dry matter content has been reported, which poses a challenge to cassava biofortification by conventional breeding. To identify suitable material for genetic transformation in tissue culture with the overall aim to increase β-carotene and maintain starch content as well as better understand carotenoid composition, root and leaf tissues from thirteen field-grown cassava landraces were analyzed for agronomic traits, carotenoid, chlorophyll, and starch content. The expression of five genes related to carotenoid biosynthesis were determined in selected landraces. Analysis revealed a weak negative correlation between starch and β-carotene content, whereas there was a strong positive correlation between root yield and many carotenoids including β-carotene. Carotenoid synthesis genes were expressed in both white and yellow cassava roots, but phytoene synthase 2 (PSY2), lycopene-ε-cyclase (LCYε), and β-carotenoid hydroxylase (CHYβ) expression were generally higher in yellow roots. This study identified lines with reasonably high content of starch and β-carotene that could be candidates for biofortification by further breeding or plant biotechnological means. View Full-Text
Keywords: carotenoid biosynthesis; ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS); provitamin A; biofortification carotenoid biosynthesis; ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS); provitamin A; biofortification
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MDPI and ACS Style

Olayide, P.; Large, A.; Stridh, L.; Rabbi, I.; Baldermann, S.; Stavolone, L.; Alexandersson, E. Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Thirteen Nigerian Cassava Landraces to Elucidate Starch and Carotenoid Composition. Agronomy 2020, 10, 424. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030424

AMA Style

Olayide P, Large A, Stridh L, Rabbi I, Baldermann S, Stavolone L, Alexandersson E. Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Thirteen Nigerian Cassava Landraces to Elucidate Starch and Carotenoid Composition. Agronomy. 2020; 10(3):424. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030424

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olayide, Priscilla, Annabel Large, Linnea Stridh, Ismail Rabbi, Susanne Baldermann, Livia Stavolone, and Erik Alexandersson. 2020. "Gene Expression and Metabolite Profiling of Thirteen Nigerian Cassava Landraces to Elucidate Starch and Carotenoid Composition" Agronomy 10, no. 3: 424. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030424

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