Next Article in Journal
Identification and Validation a Major QTL from “Sea Rice 86” Seedlings Conferred Salt Tolerance
Next Article in Special Issue
Development of Peach Flower Buds under Low Winter Chilling Conditions
Previous Article in Journal
Efficiency of Marine Bacteria and Yeasts on the Biocontrol Activity of Pythium ultimum in Ancho-Type Pepper Seedlings
Previous Article in Special Issue
Mild Water Stress Makes Apple Buds More Likely to Flower and More Responsive to Artificial Forcing— Impacts of an Unusually Warm and Dry Summer in Germany
 
 
Review

Chilling and Heat Requirements of Temperate Stone Fruit Trees (Prunus sp.)

1
INRES – Gartenbauwissenschaft, Universität Bonn, 53229 Bonn, Germany
2
Unidad de Hortofruticultura, Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Agroalimentaria de Aragón (CITA), Gobierno de Aragón, Avda. Montañana 930, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain
3
Departamento de Hortofruticultura, CICYTEX-Centro de Investigación ‘Finca La Orden-Valdesequera’, A-V, km 372, 06187 Guadajira, Badajoz, Spain
4
Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón - IA2 (CITA-Universidad de Zaragoza), Calle Miguel Servet 177, 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(3), 409; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030409
Received: 13 February 2020 / Revised: 3 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 March 2020 / Published: 18 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit and Nut Tree Phenology in a Warming World)
Stone fruit trees of genus Prunus, like other temperate woody species, need to accumulate a cultivar-specific amount of chilling during endodormancy, and of heat during ecodormancy to flower properly in spring. Knowing the requirements of a cultivar can be critical in determining if it can be adapted to a particular area. Growers can use this information to anticipate the future performance of their orchards and the adaptation of new cultivars to their region. In this work, the available information on chilling- and heat-requirements of almond, apricot, plum, peach, and sweet cherry cultivars is reviewed. We pay special attention to the method used for the determination of breaking dormancy, the method used to quantify chilling and heat temperatures, and the place where experiments were conducted. The results reveal different gaps in the information available, both in the lack of information of cultivars with unknown requirements and in the methodologies used. The main emerging challenges are the standardization of the conditions of each methodology and the search for biological markers for dormancy. These will help to deal with the growing number of new cultivars and the reduction of winter cold in many areas due to global warming. View Full-Text
Keywords: almond; apricot; chilling hours; chilling units; chilling portions; European plum; growing degree hours; Japanese apricot; Japanese plum; peach; sour cherry; sweet cherry almond; apricot; chilling hours; chilling units; chilling portions; European plum; growing degree hours; Japanese apricot; Japanese plum; peach; sour cherry; sweet cherry
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Fadón, E.; Herrera, S.; Guerrero, B.I.; Guerra, M.E.; Rodrigo, J. Chilling and Heat Requirements of Temperate Stone Fruit Trees (Prunus sp.). Agronomy 2020, 10, 409. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030409

AMA Style

Fadón E, Herrera S, Guerrero BI, Guerra ME, Rodrigo J. Chilling and Heat Requirements of Temperate Stone Fruit Trees (Prunus sp.). Agronomy. 2020; 10(3):409. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030409

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fadón, Erica, Sara Herrera, Brenda I. Guerrero, M. Engracia Guerra, and Javier Rodrigo. 2020. "Chilling and Heat Requirements of Temperate Stone Fruit Trees (Prunus sp.)" Agronomy 10, no. 3: 409. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10030409

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop