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A Model of Catalytic Cracking: Product Distribution and Catalyst Deactivation Depending on Saturates, Aromatics and Resins Content in Feed
Article

A Model of Catalytic Cracking: Catalyst Deactivation Induced by Feedstock and Process Variables

Division for Chemical Engineering, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk, Russia
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Academic Editor: Changzhi Li
Catalysts 2022, 12(1), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12010098
Received: 1 December 2021 / Revised: 22 December 2021 / Accepted: 10 January 2022 / Published: 14 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modeling of the Catalytic Cracking)
Changes in the quality of the feedstocks generated by involving various petroleum fractions in catalytic cracking significantly affect catalyst deactivation, which stems from coke formed on the catalyst surface. By conducting experimental studies on feedstocks and catalysts, as well as using industrial data, we studied how the content of saturates, aromatics and resins (SAR) in feedstock and the main process variables, including temperature, consumptions of the feedstock, catalyst and slops, influence the formation of catalytic coke. We also determined catalyst deactivation patterns using TG-DTA, N2 adsorption and TPD, which were further used as a basis for a kinetic model of catalytic cracking. This model helps predict the changes in reactions rates caused by coke formation and, also, evaluates quantitatively how group characteristics of the feedstock, the catalyst-to-oil ratio and slop flow influence the coke content on the catalyst and the degree of catalyst deactivation. We defined that a total loss of acidity changes from 8.6 to 30.4 wt% for spent catalysts, and this depends on SAR content in feedstock and process variables. The results show that despite enriching the feedstock by saturates, the highest coke yields (4.6–5.2 wt%) may be produced due to the high content of resins (2.1–3.5 wt%). View Full-Text
Keywords: saturates; resins; aromatics; catalyst-to-oil ratio; slops; catalyst; coke; activity saturates; resins; aromatics; catalyst-to-oil ratio; slops; catalyst; coke; activity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nazarova, G.Y.; Ivashkina, E.N.; Ivanchina, E.D.; Mezhova, M.Y. A Model of Catalytic Cracking: Catalyst Deactivation Induced by Feedstock and Process Variables. Catalysts 2022, 12, 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12010098

AMA Style

Nazarova GY, Ivashkina EN, Ivanchina ED, Mezhova MY. A Model of Catalytic Cracking: Catalyst Deactivation Induced by Feedstock and Process Variables. Catalysts. 2022; 12(1):98. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12010098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nazarova, Galina Y., Elena N. Ivashkina, Emiliya D. Ivanchina, and Maria Y. Mezhova. 2022. "A Model of Catalytic Cracking: Catalyst Deactivation Induced by Feedstock and Process Variables" Catalysts 12, no. 1: 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/catal12010098

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