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Open AccessArticle

Design Applicable 3D Microfluidic Functional Units Using 2D Topology Optimization with Length Scale Constraints

by Yuchen Guo 1,2, Hui Pan 1, Eddie Wadbro 3 and Zhenyu Liu 1,*
1
Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics (CIOMP), Chinese Academy of Science, Changchun 130033, China
2
University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049, China
3
Department of Computing Science, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Micromachines 2020, 11(6), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11060613
Received: 15 November 2019 / Revised: 1 June 2020 / Accepted: 13 June 2020 / Published: 24 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimization of Microfluidic Devices)
Due to the limits of computational time and computer memory, topology optimization problems involving fluidic flow frequently use simplified 2D models. Extruded versions of the 2D optimized results typically comprise the 3D designs to be fabricated. In practice, the depth of the fabricated flow channels is finite; the limited flow depth together with the no-slip condition potentially make the fluidic performance of the 3D model very different from that of the simplified 2D model. This discrepancy significantly limits the usefulness of performing topology optimization involving fluidic flow in 2D—at least if special care is not taken. Inspired by the electric circuit analogy method, we limit the widths of the microchannels in the 2D optimization process. To reduce the difference of fluidic performance between the 2D model and its 3D counterpart, we propose an applicable 2D optimization model, and ensure the manufacturability of the obtained layout, combinations of several morphology-mimicking filters impose maximum or minimum length scales on the solid phase or the fluidic phase. Two typical Lab-on-chip functional units, Tesla valve and fluidic channel splitter, are used to illustrate the validity of the proposed application of length scale control. View Full-Text
Keywords: topology optimization; fluidic flow; length scale control; morphology mimicking filters topology optimization; fluidic flow; length scale control; morphology mimicking filters
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Guo, Y.; Pan, H.; Wadbro, E.; Liu, Z. Design Applicable 3D Microfluidic Functional Units Using 2D Topology Optimization with Length Scale Constraints. Micromachines 2020, 11, 613.

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