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Article

Metabolic, Affective and Neurocognitive Characterization of Metabolic Syndrome Patients with and without Food Addiction. Implications for Weight Progression

1
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08907 Barcelona, Spain
2
CIBER Physiology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Carlos III Health Institute, 28029 Madrid, Spain
3
Integrative Pharmacology and Neurosciences Systems, Institut Hospital del Mar d’Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM), 08003 Barcelona, Spain
4
Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (CEXS-UPF), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002 Barcelona, Spain
5
Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Human Nutrition Unit, Reus, 43201 Tarragona, Spain
6
Institut d’Investigació Pere Virgili (IISPV), Reus, 43204 Tarragona, Spain
7
The Sant Joan University Hospital, Human Nutrition Unit, 43201 Reus, Spain
8
Lipids and Vascular Risk Unit, Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL, Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08907 Barcelona, Spain
9
Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Barcelona, Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08907 Barcelona, Spain
10
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
11
Department of Psychobiology and Methodology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this.
Academic Editor: Satoshi Nagaoka
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2779; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082779
Received: 14 July 2021 / Revised: 6 August 2021 / Accepted: 11 August 2021 / Published: 13 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Cognition in Health and Disease)
According to the food addiction (FA) model, the consumption of certain types of food could be potentially addictive and can lead to changes in intake regulation. We aimed to describe metabolic parameters, dietary characteristics, and affective and neurocognitive vulnerabilities of individuals with and without FA, and to explore its influences on weight loss progression. The sample included 448 adults (55–75 years) with overweight/obesity and metabolic syndrome from the PREDIMED-Plus cognition sub-study. Cognitive and psychopathological assessments, as well as dietary, biochemical, and metabolic measurements, were assessed at baseline. Weight progression was evaluated after a 3-year follow up. The presence of FA was associated with higher depressive symptomatology, neurocognitive decline, low quality of life, high body mass index (BMI), and high waist circumference, but not with metabolic comorbidities. No differences were observed in the dietary characteristics except for the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids consumption. After three years, the presence of FA at baseline resulted in a significantly higher weight regain. FA is associated with worse psychological and neurocognitive state and higher weight regain in adults with metabolic syndrome. This condition could be an indicator of bad prognosis in the search for a successful weight loss process. View Full-Text
Keywords: food addiction; metabolic syndrome; neurocognitive state; depression; quality of life food addiction; metabolic syndrome; neurocognitive state; depression; quality of life
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MDPI and ACS Style

Camacho-Barcia, L.; Munguía, L.; Lucas, I.; de la Torre, R.; Salas-Salvadó, J.; Pintó, X.; Corella, D.; Granero, R.; Jiménez-Murcia, S.; González-Monje, I.; Esteve-Luque, V.; Cuenca-Royo, A.; Gómez-Martínez, C.; Paz-Graniel, I.; Forcano, L.; Fernández-Aranda, F. Metabolic, Affective and Neurocognitive Characterization of Metabolic Syndrome Patients with and without Food Addiction. Implications for Weight Progression. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2779. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082779

AMA Style

Camacho-Barcia L, Munguía L, Lucas I, de la Torre R, Salas-Salvadó J, Pintó X, Corella D, Granero R, Jiménez-Murcia S, González-Monje I, Esteve-Luque V, Cuenca-Royo A, Gómez-Martínez C, Paz-Graniel I, Forcano L, Fernández-Aranda F. Metabolic, Affective and Neurocognitive Characterization of Metabolic Syndrome Patients with and without Food Addiction. Implications for Weight Progression. Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2779. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082779

Chicago/Turabian Style

Camacho-Barcia, Lucía, Lucero Munguía, Ignacio Lucas, Rafael de la Torre, Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Xavier Pintó, Dolores Corella, Roser Granero, Susana Jiménez-Murcia, Inmaculada González-Monje, Virginia Esteve-Luque, Aida Cuenca-Royo, Carlos Gómez-Martínez, Indira Paz-Graniel, Laura Forcano, and Fernando Fernández-Aranda. 2021. "Metabolic, Affective and Neurocognitive Characterization of Metabolic Syndrome Patients with and without Food Addiction. Implications for Weight Progression" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2779. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082779

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