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Nutraceuticals in the Mediterranean Diet: Potential Avenues for Breast Cancer Treatment

1
Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Calabria, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italy
2
Centro Sanitario, University of Calabria, 87036 Arcavacata di Rende (CS), Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Joint senior authors.
Academic Editor: Anna Gramza-Michałowska
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2557; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082557
Received: 26 June 2021 / Revised: 22 July 2021 / Accepted: 25 July 2021 / Published: 26 July 2021
The traditional Mediterranean Diet constitutes a food model that refers to the dietary patterns of the population living in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea in the early 1960s. A huge volume of literature data suggests that the Mediterranean-style diet provides several dietary compounds that have been reported to exert beneficial biological effects against a wide spectrum of chronic illnesses, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer including breast carcinoma. Among bioactive nutrients identified as protective factors for breast cancer, natural polyphenols, retinoids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antitumoral properties. The multiple anticancer mechanisms involved include the modulation of molecular events and signaling pathways associated with cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, antioxidant enzymes and immune responses. This review summarizes the anticancer action of some polyphenols, like resveratrol and epigallocatechin 3-gallate, retinoids and omega-3 PUFAs by highlighting the important hallmarks of cancer in terms of (i) cell cycle growth arrest, (ii) apoptosis, (iii) inflammation and (iv) angiogenesis. The data collected from in vitro and in vivo studies strongly indicate that these natural compounds could be the prospective candidates for the future anticancer therapeutics in breast cancer disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: mediterranean diet; nutraceuticals; resveratrol; epigallocatechin gallate; retinoids; omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; cell cycle; apoptosis; inflammation; angiogenesis mediterranean diet; nutraceuticals; resveratrol; epigallocatechin gallate; retinoids; omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; cell cycle; apoptosis; inflammation; angiogenesis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Augimeri, G.; Montalto, F.I.; Giordano, C.; Barone, I.; Lanzino, M.; Catalano, S.; Andò, S.; De Amicis, F.; Bonofiglio, D. Nutraceuticals in the Mediterranean Diet: Potential Avenues for Breast Cancer Treatment. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2557. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082557

AMA Style

Augimeri G, Montalto FI, Giordano C, Barone I, Lanzino M, Catalano S, Andò S, De Amicis F, Bonofiglio D. Nutraceuticals in the Mediterranean Diet: Potential Avenues for Breast Cancer Treatment. Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2557. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082557

Chicago/Turabian Style

Augimeri, Giuseppina, Francesca I. Montalto, Cinzia Giordano, Ines Barone, Marilena Lanzino, Stefania Catalano, Sebastiano Andò, Francesca De Amicis, and Daniela Bonofiglio. 2021. "Nutraceuticals in the Mediterranean Diet: Potential Avenues for Breast Cancer Treatment" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2557. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082557

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