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Review

Dietary Supplementation for Para-Athletes: A Systematic Review

1
College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B2, Canada
2
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jill Parnell
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 2016; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062016
Received: 7 May 2021 / Revised: 7 June 2021 / Accepted: 9 June 2021 / Published: 11 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Performance Nutrition in Diverse Populations)
The use of dietary supplements is high among athletes and non-athletes alike, as well as able-bodied individuals and those with impairments. However, evidence is lacking in the use of dietary supplements for sport performance in a para-athlete population (e.g., those training for the Paralympics or similar competition). Our objective was to examine the literature regarding evidence for various sport supplements in a para-athlete population. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed, SPORTDiscus, MedLine, and Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine Source. Fifteen studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in our review. Seven varieties of supplements were investigated in the studies reviewed, including caffeine, creatine, buffering agents, fish oil, leucine, and vitamin D. The evidence for each of these supplements remains inconclusive, with varying results between studies. Limitations of research in this area include the heterogeneity of the subjects within the population regarding functionality and impairment. Very few studies included individuals with impairments other than spinal cord injury. Overall, more research is needed to strengthen the evidence for or against supplement use in para-athletes. Future research is also recommended on performance in para-athlete populations with classifiable impairments other than spinal cord injuries. View Full-Text
Keywords: paralympics; sport nutrition; caffeine; creatine; spinal cord injury; brain injury; cerebral palsy paralympics; sport nutrition; caffeine; creatine; spinal cord injury; brain injury; cerebral palsy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shaw, K.A.; Zello, G.A.; Bandy, B.; Ko, J.; Bertrand, L.; Chilibeck, P.D. Dietary Supplementation for Para-Athletes: A Systematic Review. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2016. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062016

AMA Style

Shaw KA, Zello GA, Bandy B, Ko J, Bertrand L, Chilibeck PD. Dietary Supplementation for Para-Athletes: A Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2021; 13(6):2016. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062016

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shaw, Keely A., Gordon A. Zello, Brian Bandy, Jongbum Ko, Leandy Bertrand, and Philip D. Chilibeck. 2021. "Dietary Supplementation for Para-Athletes: A Systematic Review" Nutrients 13, no. 6: 2016. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062016

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