Next Article in Journal
The Impact of COVID-19 on Eating Environments and Activity in Early Childhood Education and Care in Alberta, Canada: A Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Journal
Branched Chain Amino Acid Supplementation to a Hypocaloric Diet Does Not Affect Resting Metabolic Rate but Increases Postprandial Fat Oxidation Response in Overweight and Obese Adults after Weight Loss Intervention
Article

Assessment of Glycemic Response to Model Breakfasts Varying in Glycemic Index (GI) in 5–7-Year-Old School Children

1
Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YF, UK
2
Nestlé Research Center, 1000 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Cherubini Valentino
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4246; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124246
Received: 29 October 2021 / Revised: 16 November 2021 / Accepted: 23 November 2021 / Published: 26 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Carbohydrates)
Reduced Glycemic Index (GI) of breakfast has been linked to improved cognitive performance in both children and adult populations across the morning. However, few studies have profiled the post-prandial glycemic response (PPGR) in younger children. The aim of this study was to assess PPGR to breakfast interventions differing in GI in healthy children aged 5–7 years. Eleven subjects completed an open-label, randomized, cross-over trial, receiving three equicaloric test beverages (260 kcal) consisting of 125 mL semi-skimmed milk and 50 g sugar (either glucose, sucrose, or isomaltulose). On a fourth occasion, the sucrose beverage was delivered as intermittent supply. PPGR was measured over 180 min using Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM). The incremental area under the curve (3h-iAUC) was highest for the glucose beverage, followed by intermittent sucrose (−21%, p = 0.288), sucrose (−27%, p = 0.139), and isomaltulose (−48%, p = 0.018). The isomaltulose beverage induced the smallest Cmax (7.8 mmol/L vs. >9.2 mmol/L for others) and the longest duration with moderate glucose level, between baseline value and 7.8 mmol/L (150 vs. <115 min for others). These results confirm that substituting mid-high GI sugars (e.g., sucrose and glucose) with low GI sugars (e.g., isomaltulose) during breakfast are a viable strategy for sustained energy release and glycemic response during the morning even in younger children. View Full-Text
Keywords: post-prandial glycemic response (PPGR); cognition; children; Glycemic Index (GI) post-prandial glycemic response (PPGR); cognition; children; Glycemic Index (GI)
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sünram-Lea, S.I.; Gentile-Rapinett, G.; Macé, K.; Rytz, A. Assessment of Glycemic Response to Model Breakfasts Varying in Glycemic Index (GI) in 5–7-Year-Old School Children. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4246. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124246

AMA Style

Sünram-Lea SI, Gentile-Rapinett G, Macé K, Rytz A. Assessment of Glycemic Response to Model Breakfasts Varying in Glycemic Index (GI) in 5–7-Year-Old School Children. Nutrients. 2021; 13(12):4246. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124246

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sünram-Lea, Sandra I., Gertrude Gentile-Rapinett, Katherine Macé, and Andreas Rytz. 2021. "Assessment of Glycemic Response to Model Breakfasts Varying in Glycemic Index (GI) in 5–7-Year-Old School Children" Nutrients 13, no. 12: 4246. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124246

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop