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Changes in Foods Served and Meal Costs in Boston Family Child Care Homes after One Year of Implementing the New Child and Adult Care Food Program Nutrition Standards

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2817; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092817
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 4 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 15 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Policies and Diet)
This study aimed to determine the impact of 2017 revisions to the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) nutrition standards on foods and beverages served and meal costs in family child care homes (FCCHs). Our pre–post study utilized four weeks of menus and food receipts from 13 FCCH providers in Boston, MA prior to CACFP nutrition standards changes in 2017 and again one year later, resulting in n = 476 menu observation days. We compared daily servings of food and beverage items to the updated standards. Generalized estimating equation models tested for changes in adherence to the standards and meal costs. FCCHs offered more whole grains and less juice and refined grains from baseline to follow-up. FCCHs were more likely to meet the revised whole grain standard at follow-up (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.4, 5.2, p = 0.002), but rarely met all selected standards together. Inflation-adjusted meal costs increased for lunch (+$0.27, p = 0.001) and afternoon snack (+$0.25, p = 0.048). FCCH providers may need assistance with meeting CACFP standards while ensuring that meal costs do not exceed reimbursement rates. View Full-Text
Keywords: child care; CACFP; nutrition policy child care; CACFP; nutrition policy
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Poole, M.K.; Cradock, A.L.; Kenney, E.L. Changes in Foods Served and Meal Costs in Boston Family Child Care Homes after One Year of Implementing the New Child and Adult Care Food Program Nutrition Standards. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2817.

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