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Open AccessArticle

A High Polyphenol Diet Improves Psychological Well-Being: The Polyphenol Intervention Trial (PPhIT)

1
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Eleftheriou Venizelou 70, 17671 Kallithea, Greece
2
Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK
3
Cardiology Department, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast BT9 7AB, UK
4
Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth BH12 5BB, UK
5
Institute for Global Food Security, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5DL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2445; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082445
Received: 29 May 2020 / Revised: 10 August 2020 / Accepted: 12 August 2020 / Published: 14 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Human Health)
Mental ill health is currently one of the leading causes of disease burden worldwide. A growing body of data has emerged supporting the role of diet, especially polyphenols, which have anxiolytic and antidepressant-like properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a high polyphenol diet (HPD) compared to a low polyphenol diet (LPD) on aspects of psychological well-being in the Polyphenol Intervention Trial (PPhIT). Ninety-nine mildly hypertensive participants aged 40–65 years were enrolled in a four-week LPD washout period and then randomised to either an LPD or an HPD for eight weeks. Both at baseline and the end of intervention, participants’ lifestyle and psychological well-being were assessed. The participants in the HPD group reported a decrease in depressive symptoms, as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory-II, and an improvement in physical component and mental health component scores as assessed with 36-Item Short Form Survey. No differences in anxiety, stress, self-esteem or body image perception were observed. In summary, the study findings suggest that the adoption of a polyphenol-rich diet could potentially lead to beneficial effects including a reduction in depressive symptoms and improvements in general mental health status and physical health in hypertensive participants. View Full-Text
Keywords: polyphenols; fruits; berries; vegetables; dark chocolate; psychological well-being; depression; physical health; mental health polyphenols; fruits; berries; vegetables; dark chocolate; psychological well-being; depression; physical health; mental health
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Kontogianni, M.D.; Vijayakumar, A.; Rooney, C.; Noad, R.L.; Appleton, K.M.; McCarthy, D.; Donnelly, M.; Young, I.S.; McKinley, M.C.; McKeown, P.P.; Woodside, J.V. A High Polyphenol Diet Improves Psychological Well-Being: The Polyphenol Intervention Trial (PPhIT). Nutrients 2020, 12, 2445.

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