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Open AccessArticle

Updated Food Composition Database for Cereal-Based Gluten Free Products in Spain: Is Reformulation Moving on?

Departamento de Ciencias Farmacéuticas y de la Salud, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad San Pablo-CEU, CEU Universities, Urbanización Montepríncipe, Alcorcón, 28925 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Natalia Úbeda and Elena Alonso-Aperte share senior authorship.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2369; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082369
Received: 21 July 2020 / Revised: 4 August 2020 / Accepted: 5 August 2020 / Published: 7 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Gluten-Free Diet)
We developed a comprehensive composition database of 629 cereal-based gluten free (GF) products available in Spain. Information on ingredients and nutritional composition was retrieved from food package labels. GF products were primarily composed of rice and/or corn flour, and 90% of them included added rice starch. The most common added fat was sunflower oil (present in one third of the products), followed by palm fat, olive oil, and cocoa. Only 24.5% of the products had the nutrition claim “no added sugar”. Fifty-six percent of the GF products had sucrose in their formulation. Xanthan gum was the most frequently employed fiber, appearing in 34.2% of the GF products, followed by other commonly used such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (23.1%), guar gum (19.7%), and vegetable gums (19.6%). Macronutrient analysis revealed that 25.4% of the products could be labeled as a source of fiber. Many of the considered GF food products showed very high contents of energy (33.5%), fats (28.5%), saturated fatty acids (30.0%), sugars (21.6%), and salt (28.3%). There is a timid reformulation in fat composition and salt reduction, but a lesser usage of alternative flours and pseudocereals. View Full-Text
Keywords: gluten-free products; celiac disease; gluten-free diet; gluten containing products; food composition database gluten-free products; celiac disease; gluten-free diet; gluten containing products; food composition database
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fajardo, V.; González, M.P.; Martínez, M.; Samaniego-Vaesken, M.d.L.; Achón, M.; Úbeda, N.; Alonso-Aperte, E. Updated Food Composition Database for Cereal-Based Gluten Free Products in Spain: Is Reformulation Moving on? Nutrients 2020, 12, 2369. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082369

AMA Style

Fajardo V, González MP, Martínez M, Samaniego-Vaesken MdL, Achón M, Úbeda N, Alonso-Aperte E. Updated Food Composition Database for Cereal-Based Gluten Free Products in Spain: Is Reformulation Moving on? Nutrients. 2020; 12(8):2369. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082369

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fajardo, Violeta; González, María P.; Martínez, María; Samaniego-Vaesken, María d.L.; Achón, María; Úbeda, Natalia; Alonso-Aperte, Elena. 2020. "Updated Food Composition Database for Cereal-Based Gluten Free Products in Spain: Is Reformulation Moving on?" Nutrients 12, no. 8: 2369. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082369

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