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Open AccessReview

Infant Formula Supplemented with Biotics: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

1
Functional Foods Forum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland
2
Danone Nutricia Research, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
Department of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CG Utrecht, The Netherlands
4
Instituto de Lactología Industrial (INLAIN, UNL-CONICET), Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, Santa Fe 3000, Argentina
5
Department of Paediatrics at the Medical University of Warsaw, 02091 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 1952; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071952
Received: 9 June 2020 / Revised: 27 June 2020 / Accepted: 28 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Milk, HMO, Lactation and Application in Infant Feeding)
Breastfeeding is natural and the optimal basis of infant nutrition and development, with many benefits for maternal health. Human milk is a dynamic fluid fulfilling an infant’s specific nutritional requirements and guiding the growth, developmental, and physiological processes of the infant. Human milk is considered unique in composition, and it is influenced by several factors, such as maternal diet and health, body composition, and geographic region. Human milk stands as a model for infant formula providing nutritional solutions for infants not able to receive enough mother’s milk. Infant formulas aim to mimic the composition and functionality of human milk by providing ingredients reflecting those of the latest human milk insights, such as oligosaccharides, bacteria, and bacterial metabolites. The objective of this narrative review is to discuss the most recent developments in infant formula with a special focus on human milk oligosaccharides and postbiotics. View Full-Text
Keywords: human milk oligosaccharides; probiotics; prebiotics; synbiotics; postbiotics; 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL); lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT); 3′-galactosyllactose (3′-GL); breastfeeding; infant formula human milk oligosaccharides; probiotics; prebiotics; synbiotics; postbiotics; 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL); lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT); 3′-galactosyllactose (3′-GL); breastfeeding; infant formula
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MDPI and ACS Style

Salminen, S.; Stahl, B.; Vinderola, G.; Szajewska, H. Infant Formula Supplemented with Biotics: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1952.

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